Example a sufficient condition for getting an a in

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Example: A sufficient condition for getting an A in TC300 is getting an A on every piece of graded work in the course. This means that if a student gets an A on every piece of graded work in the course, then the student gets an A. Handing in a final report is not a sufficient condition for getting an A in the course. It is possible to hand in a term paper and not to get an A in the course. Getting an A on every piece of graded work is not a necessary condition for getting an A in the course. It is possible to get an A in the course even though one fails to get an A on some piece of graded work.
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Sufficient Conditions If we say that "x is a sufficient condition for y," then we mean that if we have x, then y must follow. In other words, x guarantees y. Example: Earning a total of 95% in this class is a sufficient condition for earning a final grade of A. If you have 95% for the course, then it must follow that you will have a final grade of A. Pouring a gallon of freezing water on my sleeping daughter is sufficient to wake her up. If I pour the gallon of freezing water on her then its guaranteed that she will wake up. Note: In none of these examples is the sufficient condition also a necessary condition .
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Sufficient Conditions For example, it is unnecessary to earn 95% to earn an A in this course. You can earn 92% to earn an A. (We cannot say that if you do not have 95% points then you can't have an A.) It is not necessary to pour a gallon of freezing water on my daughter to wake her up. (An alarm clock will do it as well.)
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In Summary Arguments have three parts: 1. Data 2. Warrant 3. Claim The warrant joins the data and the claim by interpreting the data in terms of what is already known
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In Summary The warrant makes inferences about what is already known in one of two ways: 1. Deduction Taking what is known about something in general and making a prediction about something in particular. The conclusion confirms what is already known. 2. Induction Taking what is known about something in particular and making a prediction about something in general . The conclusion asserts what will probably, but not certainly, happen.
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In Summary The probability of whether inferences are likely to occur depend on two conditions: 1. Necessary conditions Although X may be a necessary condition for Y to happen does not mean that X guarantees Y. 2. Sufficient conditions If X is a sufficient condition for Y to happen, then the presence/occurrence of X guarantees the presence/occurrence of Y.
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