The Freedmans Bureau struggled as Congress refused to increas its funding which

The freedmans bureau struggled as congress refused to

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former slaves. The Freedman’s Bureau struggled as Congress refused to increase its funding, which expired in 1872. Freeport Doctrine: During the Lincoln-Douglas debates, Lincoln challenged Douglas to rationalize the concept of popular sovereignty with the decision of the Dred Scott case. Douglas stated that territories would have to pass and enforce laws to protect slavery. In essence, he argued that Dred Scott would still be the law of the land but that, by willfully choosing to not arm themselves with the means to police the issue, territories could still functionally be free soil. This attempt to appease both wings of the Democratic Party alienated supporters in the South, dwindling the chances of Douglas to win the presidency in 1860. Fugitive Slave Act: A controversial law that constituted part of the Compromise of 1850. It required that escaped slaves, upon their capture, would be returned to their masters, and that the authorities in a free state had to cooperate with this process. Nicknamed the “Bloodhound Law” by abolitionists for the common use of such dogs in hunting down slaves. Gadsden Purchase: An 1853 treaty between the U.S. and Mexico. It was ratified in 1854. The treaty resolved a border issue lingering from the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. In exchange for $10 million, the U.S. purchased a chunk of
modern-day Arizona and a small portion of southwest New Mexico. This was the last notable expansion of the continental U.S. George Fitzhugh: A notable proslavery intellectual. His sociology books detailed the allegedly happy lives of Southern slaves who were clothed, fed, and housed by benevolent slave owners. Fitzhugh argued in his book Cannibals All (1857) that African American slaves were much better off than the “Northern wage slave,” who was not provided with basic living needs for him and his family. Fitzhugh also argued that slavery itself could easily be applicable to whites. George McClellan: A veteran of the Mexican-American War, McClellan is most famous for his short tenure as general-in-chief of the Union Army during the Civil War. McClellan was a meticulous planner, taking care to plan his operations and train his men. However, he was timid on the battlefield, and frequently overestimated the strength of Confederate forces. Lincoln removed him as general-in-chief of the Union Army after Antietam. He was the Democratic nominee for president in 1864 election. Gettysburg Address: A brief, poignant address by Abraham Lincoln commemorating the Battle of Gettysburg. It was delivered on November 19, 1863. Harkening back to the Declaration of Independence 87 years prior, Lincoln proposed the idea of equality —“all men are created equal”— as the core spirit of the Declaration and the Constitution. He goes on to reframe the context of the Civil War as a trial to see if equality can endure rather than being solely an issue of preserving the Constitution’s political framework (“the Union”). Gold Rush: Commonly refers to the California Gold Rush, which took place between 1848 and roughly 1855. The population of California ballooned as prospectors flocked to the state to seek a fortune in mining gold. Over 100,000

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