Tartrates of potassium acid salts that sometimes unpredictably fall out of

Tartrates of potassium acid salts that sometimes

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Tartrates of potassium acid salts that sometimes unpredictably fall out of solution o It’s not a wine flaw, it wasn’t stabilized properly It should naturally be in solution and is safe to drink o Sometimes, you can see white which id a different type of acid Other acids mentioned that Boyer doesn’t know if he will test on o 1. Citric acid (small amounts) Limes, lemons, pineapples, oranges Found in minute quantities in grapes Used to boost acid profiles Helps build spine Boyer does not think these is used in high quantities, because it would then add citric flavor (which you don’t want) o 2. Absorbic acid (vitamin C) Young wine grapes, lost in the wine process Used with sulfur dioxide as an anti-oxidant Acidity adds a sharpness to the flavors and is detected most readily by a prickling sensation on the sides of the tongue and a mouth-watering aftertaste *** o Acidic, tart, white wines Boyer lists Vino Verde from Northern Portugal or Avardino from Northwestern Spain o Younger wines like sauvignon blanc from new Zealand, Chablis from central France Higher acid profile and are crisp, refreshing
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Balance of acidity o If you have a grape that is super sweet with high sugars, without acid, the wine is terrible o Acid helps to counterbalance the sensations of sugar o A wine with too much acidity will taste excessively sour and sharp o A wine with too little acidity will taste flabby and flat, with less defined flavors Like drinking Kool-Aid (you never seen green) Has fruit flavor, but is not complex and it just sits in your mouth Grapes grown in warmer climates have lower acidity than grapes grown in cooler climates o Ex: Chablis in France (Northern, Central) Only grows chardonnay along with California High acids because the climate is much cooler in France Crisper, acidic Chablis grape Less acids in California since climate is much hotter Softer, lusher Chardonnay grape Would get more sugars because of the hotter weather as well Maintain acid profile #1: Go to a higher latitude (cooler like Germany or New Zealand) gives a shorter growing season o New Zealand is not given enough credit for being cooler o They grow higher acidic whites Riesling quite high acidity, even though the Germans make it sweet New Zealand sauvignon blanc is one of the most acidic wines Boyer has ever had o Shorter growing season Maintain acid profile #2: Go to higher altitude (20-30K feet, cant actually do because the highest mountain is 29K) o That is snow-capped o Cooler growing conditions o Experimenting in Mendoza, Argentina In tropical, but going really high to 5, 6, 8K feet to see what it does to the grape Higher acid profile since it is a cooler location o Boyer was in Greece last summer, blazing hot Went to winery 3,000 feet in elevation Peloponesian climate, hot!!!
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  • Spring '12
  • John Boyer
  • Sauvignon blanc,  July

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