Social structure that predicable enduring feature of

This preview shows page 16 - 17 out of 41 pages.

Social structure : that predicable, enduring feature of social life Role : the expected behaviour of an individual in a social position and the duties associated with that position o Fulfillment of these expectations promotes effective interaction (clues to success are contained in the role itself) o The roles we play and social scripts we follow are related to our identity : all the ways in which we view and describe ourselves (female/male, friend, student, attractive, unusual, etc) and in which others perceive us o Dramaturgical perspective : the social roles we play are the source-not necessarily the expression-of our identities. o Symbolic interactionists: the social roles we play are the main origin of our identities, roles and identities are interrelated o Roles shape our identities and, perhaps, interact with and even conflict with our personalities and basic inclinations o Roles and identities are embedded in categories and communities. Nowhere is the production and reproduction of social structure more obvious than in communities Community : group of people who interact and communicate often with one another and share common interests, values, and goals o Immersed their person identities in the community enterprise, the conform to community standards Demographic categories: (men/women/old/rich/poor etc) are different from social communities. o People belonging to the same category do not communicate or interact with each other merely based on their shared membership in that category, i.e. 19 year old from Mississauga, less likely to identify with demographic categories Category mobilization : what social movements are about – women’s movement, etc (can turn into a social community) Charles Horton Cooley: concept of the looking-glass self to illustrate how we form our identifies (used before labeling theory) o Looking-glass self : people come to see (and value) themselves as others see them Goffman notes that roles and identities are so closely intertwined that the two almost overlap: o Role embracement : a person willingly accepts both the social role and the identity associated with it I.e. woman who becomes a nun assumes the identity (as well as role) of a deeply religious, upright person o Role distance : take on a role but keep separate their behaviour from the identity associated with that role While you embrace your role as a son/daughter, you distance your role as affectionate child from a dependent child o Role Exit : process a person undergoes when leaving a role. Rejects/loss of certain activities, rights, and responsibilities, and also the loss of an identity associated with the role You are a student now, but after earning your diploma, you will likely not describe yourself as a student any longer Interactionist perspective: identities are socially determined, based on the social roles we play. They are not inborn, like personality We internalize the roles we play so that they become an integral part of our identities. I.e. embracing the role as a new parent.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture