Bush also asserts on the influence of Al Qaeda on the people of Afghanistan The

Bush also asserts on the influence of al qaeda on the

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merely to end lives, but to disrupt and end a way of life.” Bush also asserts on the influence of Al-Qaeda on the people of Afghanistan, “The leadership of al Qaeda has great influence in Afghanistan and supports the Taliban regime in controlling most of that country. In Afghanistan, we see al Qaeda's vision for the world. Afghanistan's people have been brutalized - many are starving, and many have fled. Women are not allowed to attend school. You can be jailed for owning a television. Religion can be practiced only as their leaders dictate. A man can be jailed in Afghanistan if his beard is not long enough". According to Murphy, President Bush continues to amplify the evilness of Al-Qaeda by comparing them to other destructive regimes with comparable ideologies such as the Soviet Union and the Nazis. Although these enemies may have been more of a threat during their moments of power, within this textual world, Al-Qaeda appeared a greater menace, comparable to the worst in American history (Murphy 615). According to Jamieson, “Carefully worded claims both reveal a lack of confidence in the evidence and reduce Bush's accountability for it"(Jamieson 258). Despite the use of various supporting materials, President Bush never correlates his points to any credible source. Throughout his speech only once Bush alludes to any source at all is when he familiarizes Americans about the mastermind behind the terror attacks of 9/11 stating that “The evidence we have gathered all points to a collection of loosely affiliated terrorist organizations known as Al Qaeda.” "As the administration made the case for war, it offered one argument that could only be refuted with evidence to which the public was not privy" (Jamieson 260). President Bush’s
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4 argument expected the audience to fill in the gaps of his argumentation with hypotheses and propels them to think that this classified information justifies the conclusion. President Bush’s inclination for epideictic rhetoric characterized the problem faced was not merely one, but rather a collection of them. In the speech, Bush never moved "much beyond the memorialization of the dead, the amplification of Al-Qaeda's evilness and the hope of retribution" (Murphy 617). Even
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  • Fall '07
  • NICHOLAS,CHERYLL
  • Al-Qaeda, September 11 attacks, War on Terrorism

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