Subcutaneous layer subq is also known as the

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Subcutaneous Layer (SubQ) – is also known as the hypodermis and is located under the dermis, loose adipose tissue that attaches to skin and underlying organs. Layers of Epidermis – C L G S B C ute L ittle G irls S peak B elgium” Stratum Corneum – the outermost layer, 20 layers of flat cell-remnants, dead keratinocytes. Stratum Lucidum* - only in thick skin. Stratum Granulosum – filled with granules of keratin. Stratum Spinosum – layer of 8-10 keratinocytes. Stratum Basale (Germinativum) bottom or deepest layer, continuous cell division occurs here and produces all other layers. Types of Skin Thin Skin – 4 layers and is found on the majority of the body, has hair. Thick skin – 5 layers and is found on the soles of feet, palms of hands and digits, no hair. Stages of Wound Healing Inflammatory phase - is the body’s natural response to injury. After initial wounding, the blood vessels in the wound bed contract and a clot is formed. It is at this stage that the characteristic signs of inflammation can be seen; erythema , heat, edema, pain and functional disturbance. Proliferation - the wound is ‘rebuilt’ with new granulation tissue which is comprised of collagen and extracellular matrix and into which a new network of blood vessels develop.
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Maturation - is the final phase and occurs once the wound has closed. This phase involves remodelling of collagen. Cellular activity reduces and the number of blood vessels in the wounded area regress and decrease. Simple Squamous Epithelium - is a single layer of flat cells in contact with the basal lamina (one of the two layers of the basement membrane) of the epithelium. This type of epithelium is often permeable and occurs where small molecules need to pass quickly through membranes via filtration or diffusion. (i.e. blood vessels are lined by simple squamous epithelium (which is more specifically called endothelium when it lines a blood vessel). Transitional Epithelium Tissue - is a type of stratified epithelium – tissue consisting of multiple layers of epithelial cells which can contract and expand as needed. It is so named because of this function in the transition of degree of distension. These cells are called transitional because they can undergo a change in their shape and structure. (i.e. a layer of cells that forms the mucosal lining of your ureters, a portion of your urethra, and your urinary bladder.) Hypertrophic Scar vs. Keloid Scar Hypertrophic Scar - is a cutaneous condition characterized by deposits of excessive amounts of collagen which gives rise to a raised scar, but not to the degree observed with keloids. Like keloids, they form most often at the sites of pimples, body piercings, cuts and burns. They often contain nerves and blood vessels.
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  • Spring '08
  • Mihai

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