13 interpersonal roles all managers are required to

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13 Interpersonal Roles All managers are required to perform duties that are cer- emonial and symbolic in nature. For instance, when the president of a college hands out diplomas at commencement or a factory supervisor gives a group of high school students a tour of the plant, they are acting in a figurehead role. Another key interpersonal role all managers have is a leadership role. This role includes hiring, training, motivating, and disciplining employees. The third role within the interpersonal grouping is the liaison role, or contacting and fos- tering relationships with others who provide valuable information. The sales manager who obtains information from the quality-control manager in his own company has an internal liaison relationship. When that sales manager has contact with other sales executives through a marketing trade association, he has external liaison relationships. Role Interpersonal Figurehead Leader Liaison Informational Monitor Disseminator Spokesperson Decisional Entrepreneur Disturbance handler Resource allocator Negotiator Minztberg's Managerial Roles Description Symbolic head; required to perform a number of routine duties of a legal or social nature Responsible for the motivation and direction of employees Maintains a network of outside contacts who provide favors and information Receives a wide variety of information; serves as nerve center of internal and external information of the organization Transmits information received from outsiders or from other employees to members of the organization Transmits information to outsiders on organization's plans, policies, actions, and results; serves as expert on organization's industry Searches organization and its environment for opportunities and initiates projects to bring about change Responsible for corrective action when organization faces important, unexpected disturbances Makes or approves significant organizational decisions Responsible for representing the organization at major negotiations Source: H. Mintzberg, The Nature of Managerial Work, 1st ed., <ll> 1973, pp. 92-93. Reprinted and electronically reproduced by permission of Pearson Education, Inc., New York, NY.
8 PART 1 Introduction technical skills The ability to apply specialized knowledge or expertise. human skills The ability to work with, understand, and motivate other people, both individually and in groups. conceptual skills The mental ability to analyze and diagnose complex situations. Informational Roles To some degree, all managers collect information from outside organizations and institutions, typically by scanning the news media and talking with other people to learn of changes in the public's tastes and what competitors may be planning. Mintzberg called this the monitor role. Man- agers also act as a conduit to transmit information to organizational members.

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