The use of online screening may be a useful way of filtering quickly through a

The use of online screening may be a useful way of

This preview shows page 14 - 16 out of 44 pages.

The use of online screening may be a useful way of filtering quickly through a huge volume of applications, or sorting applications. If there are a number of jobs that have been advertised at the same time, you could, for example, search for applications with the same job reference number. This approach, however, does require that all applications are received online.It may be difficult to ensure that the keywords or criteria used in the search do not overlook any applications which could potentially match the person specification. Some organisations that use this approach have hadto develop long application forms in order to ensure that the candidate includes all appropriate information inBSBHRM405_Learner Assessment Task V3.0 (27june2019) Richmond School of Business. CRICOS Code: 03717E |RTO Code: 45432 Page 14
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BSBHRM405 Support the recruitment, selection and induction of staffsufficient detail for their application to be selected through the word search. Other organisations only use thekeyword approach as a first step in attempting to select candidates and then go through the applications again manually to double check that all appropriate applications have been selected.If such a method is the only one used, organisations should be aware of the implications of the Data Protection Act. The Employment Practices Data Protection Code recommends that, if an automated short-listing system is used as the sole basis for making a decision, applicants should be informed. An employer should make provisions to consider representations from applicants about this and to take these into account before making the final decision.There is an initial cost in implementing online screening and shortlisting, such as the cost of software and training. These costs need to be balanced against potential benefits, such as improving the speed of the recruitment and selection process.InterviewsStructured interviews are the most effective type of interview. The interview process is formed through identification of the key requirements of the job and a list of questions is drawn up. A panel of interviewers works through each set of questions with each candidate and scores them on their answers. At the end of the interview process the overall scores are considered and the best candidate chosen. If additional selection methods are chosen, this is fed into the overall process at the end, and again, the best-fit candidate is offered the job.Even where the interview is structured, this does not mean that follow up questions cannot be asked to probe more deeply into a candidate's skills and experience. An interview which does not do this, but instead sticks to a rigid list of questions, will not allow the interviewer to obtain the information required to make a proper decision.Members involved in the interview process should be trained in interviewing skills and the sorts of questions they should or should not ask.
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