Ncaa basketball fast break lessons across the

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NCAA Basketball Fast Break: Lessons Across the Curriculum With the NCAA, © 2003, NCAA. 175 Third Grade–Fifth Grade Math 3. Discuss the answers. ( These points should be made: Net 7 does not have enough triangles, so it will not work; nets 2, 3 and 5 are really the same net; and nets 4 and 6 are the same net. ) Some students will be puzzled, so show them net 2, flip it over so it looks like net 3 and then rotate it so it looks like net 5. Advise the class to make their work easier by first identifying nets that are the same but look different because they have been rotated or flipped. 4. Inform students that some people solve these problems by imagining the faces are folding up and curling into a polyhedron. Encourage your students to em- ploy this method. If, however, a group is still unsure or disagrees, have them draw a model on card stock using poster board templates, cut it out and fold it. 5. Distribute the worksheet and other materials. Circulate. When everyone is fin- ished, have the groups report their answers. Settle disagreements by actually folding the nets. Extend and Vary the Lesson Leonard Euler (pronounced Oil-er ) discovered this relationship between the edges, vertices and faces of a polyhedron: number of faces + number of vertices – num- ber of edges = 2. Using a variety of polyhedrons, verify that the equation is true by counting the faces, vertices and edges. • Use the models to discuss parallel, intersecting, skew and perpendicular lines. Using a cube, have students color each set of parallel edges the same color. (They will need three colors.) Because the tetrahedron has no parallel edges, color each set of skew edges the same color. (Three colors will be needed.) Make a paper sculpture that moves. Make eight tetrahedrons of very sturdy paper taped with masking tape and connect them to form a ring. First, tape the tetrahe- drons together in four pairs by joining each pair at an edge. Next, join pairs so that the new connection is skew to the original connection. The new sculpture will have very fluid movement. References Hansen-Smith, B. 1999. The Geometry of Wholemovement. New York: W.H. Freeman. Stewart, M. 1988. Basketball: A History of Hoops. New York: Franklin Watts. 1. 5. 6. 7. 2. 3. 4.
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From NCAA Basketball Fast Break: Lessons Across the Curriculum With the NCAA, © 2003, NCAA. 176 Net: A Word With Many Meanings Name_____________________________________________ Date______________________ In basketball: 1891—The net is a peach basket. Every time a player makes a basket, someone has to climb a ladder to retrieve the ball. 1896—The net is a drawstring bag attached to a ring. The referee pulls a cord to release the ball after every basket. 1913—The modern net is in use. No one has to work to get the ball after a basket. In mathematics, a net is a pattern made by the edges of a hollow three-dimensional polyhedron that has been opened along its edges and then flattened. A polyhedron is a three-dimensional figure whose sides are polygons. Polygons are flat shapes like triangles, rectangles, squares and so on. Their sides are always straight and there are no openings and no extra segments sticking out.
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