Steven shaviros ideas on the significance of dreams

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Steven Shaviro’s ideas on the significance of dreams as explained in Connected offers great insight: [Dreaming] is the most antisocial activity I ever engage in. Dreaming is the one experience that I must go through alone, that I cannot possibly share with anyone else. […] Dreams are the last refuge of old-fashioned interiority and mental privacy. […]. [A] ny violation o f dream space is so disturbing […]. It means that I haven’t really withdrawn from the world after all. It means that I am nothing special. It means that I’m just the same as everybody else. The network has colonized my unconscious. (25) Mae’s idea of wanting a way to render dreams initially seems as just a part of the Circle’s mantra ‘all that happens must be known’. But adding Shaviro’s theory on dreams, Mae’s wish becomes the last significant step and boundary the Circle must overcome to succeed i n ‘Completion’ – the mystified goal of the company, which at the end of the novel is revealed to mean that the Circle strives to take over the whole of the Internet and public life as well. Dreams cannot be shared and are therefore inherently private. Keeping in mind that Annie is not merely sleeping, but unconscious and in a coma, Mae’s wish to penetrate Annie’s thoughts is even more disturbing, since in no way Annie can comply with this wish, even though agreement would already be surprising after Annie’s initial doubts about the company’s policy. It is an ultimate violation of her privacy, and proof of the company’s relentless attitude towards an individual’s will. Moreover, for Shaviro, dreams are what makes us unique, so with the violation of dreams and these ultimate private thoughts, the possibility of a complete congregation with the rest of the world becomes apparent. In The Circle’s ideology, individuality is something that must be erased, in order for the network to work (too) well.
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65 7.0 People Are Weak: Men, Women and Children (2014) If a critic writes that the subplot of a young girl struggling with an eating disorder is a part o f ‘all the melodramatic excess,’ subtlety is not the film’s strong point (Arnold). The chapter above shows what happen s if the ‘network works too well.’ On the other end of the spectrum in the dystopian portrayal of the human and technology interaction, Men, Women and Children, directed by Jason Reitman in 2014, represents a world where the social aspect of Internet use is challenged. Firstly, we see that humans are defenseless against the ‘temptations’ that lurk online. The Web is a place where people’s darkest and deepest desires are evoked and nourished. Online ‘exposure’ leads to self-destructing behavior. Everyone gets, or is already addicted and no one is safe. Secondly, the film tries to tackle the inherent irony of people being utterly disconnected in a networked world.
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