References 1 corrosion sensors for concrete bridges

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Statistics for Business & Economics, Revised
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REFERENCES: 1) “Corrosion sensors for concrete bridges”, Carkhuff, B.; Cain, R. IEEE Instrumentation & Measurement Magazine v 6 n 2 2003. p.19-24. 2) “Elaboration and standardization of an optical fibre corrosion sensor based on an electroless deposit of copper”, Benounis, M.; Jaffrezic-Renault, N.; Stremsdoerfer, G.; Kherrat, R. Sensors and Actuators B (Chemical)6th European Conference on Optical Chemical Sensors and Biosensors. EUROPT(R)ODE VI n 1-3 2003. p.90-7. 3) “An in-situ galvanically coupled multielectrode array sensor for localized corrosion”, Yang, L.; Sridhar, N.; Pensado, O.; Dunn, D. S. Corrosion v 58 n 12 2002. p.1004-14. KEYWORDS: Corrosion rate monitor, work beneath paint layer, quantitative measurement, varied environments A05-226 TITLE: Real-Time, Standoff Detection of Vehicle-Borne IEDs TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Sensors ACQUISITION PROGRAM: PEO Ground Combat Systems OBJECTIVE: Design, build and demonstrate a real-time, standoff Vehicle Borne – Improvised Explosive Device (VB-IED) detection and non-lethal neutralization system. The system must be HMMWV-mountable and capable of operating in real-time, while on the move against VB-IEDs that are either moving or stationary at a sufficient standoff distance to allow for the safe deployment of a non-lethal neutralization system. DESCRIPTION: Traditional technologies used for mine detection; such as infra-red (IR) imagers, metal detectors, and ground penetrating radars (GPR); have demonstrated some success against buried mines. However, none of these technologies can penetrate the metallic skin of vehicles nor do they provide confirmation of the presence of explosives. Explosive detection technologies such as Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR), Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), and Pulsed ELemental Analysis with Neutrons (PELAN) detect only some types of explosives, have moderate false alarm rates, require long dwell times and have short standoffs. Some of these traditional approaches may be physics-limited and not scalable for real-time and standoff detection of either explosives directly or identification of standard explosive housings (i.e., artillery shell casings). This topic seeks novel, non-traditional approaches for the real-time, standoff detection and non-lethal neutralization of VB-IEDs. The probability of detection should be high, however, because of the demanding technical challenges, a moderate false alarm rate is acceptable. This is somewhat mitigated though the use of a non-lethal neutralization system. Real-time means that the system must be capable of detecting at vehicle closing speeds of 15 mph (T) / 130 mph (O). Standoff means that the detection must occur at sufficient separation distances for minimal collateral damage upon neutralization [15 m (T) / 70 m (O)]. Although it is preferable to have sufficient standoff to allow for evasive maneuvers, collision with a post-exploded VB-IED is acceptable. Detection means either direct confirmation of explosives, identification of shell casings, or determination of hostile vehicle intent though indicators such as driving pattern and/or vehicle trajectory.
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Statistics for Business & Economics, Revised
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Chapter 13 / Exercise 16
Statistics for Business & Economics, Revised
Anderson
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