s 3 main arguments lecture p 62 1 There is genetic variation in species 2 Some

S 3 main arguments lecture p 62 1 there is genetic

This preview shows page 2 - 4 out of 10 pages.

s 3 main arguments  (lecture & p. 62) 1) There is genetic variation in species  2) Some genes are more advantageous than others  3) That variation allows for adaptation (natural selection) What are some sources of genetic variability  (lecture & text) Sexual reproduction (meiosis), natural selection, mutation, crossing-over, patterns of  mating, etc. Define natural selection  (p. 63),  mutation  (p. 70) , genotype, phenotype  (p. 67) meiosis mitosis  (p. 65 & Table 3.1, p. 66) , crossing over  (p. 66) , dominant characteristic &  recessive characteristic (text & also Table 3.2, p 68), incomplete dominance, co- dominance  (p. 69) , carrier, sex-linked, poly-genetic  (p. 70) , single gene, chromosomal  abnormalities (70-71 & lecture) and know examples of each (see Table 3.3, p. 72).  Natural selection: The evolutionary principle that individuals who have characteristics  advantageous for survival in a particular environment are most likely to survive and  reproduce. Over many generations, this process of “survival of the fittest” will lead to  changes in a species and the development of new species.
Image of page 2
Mutation: A change in the structure or arrangement of one or more genes that produces  a new phenotype. Genotype: the genetic makeup a person inherits  Phenotype: the characteristics or traits the person eventually has; The way in which a  person's genotype is expressed in observable or measurable characteristics. Meiosis: The process in which a germ cell divides, producing sperm or ova, each  containing half of the parent cell’s original complement of chromosomes; in humans, the  products of meiosis normally contain 23 chromosomes. Mitosis: The process in which a cell duplicates its chromosomes and then divides into  two genetically identical daughter cells. Crossing over: A process in which genetic material is exchanged between pairs of  chromosomes during meiosis. Dominant characteristic [dominant gene]: A relatively powerful gene that is expressed  phenotypically and masks the effect of a less-powerful recessive gene. ex. Huntington’s Recessive characteristic [recessive gene]: A less powerful gene that is not expressed  phenotypically when paired with a dominant gene; ex. PKU, Sickle Cell  Incomplete dominance: A condition in which a stronger gene fails to mask all the effects  of a weaker partner gene; a phenotype results that is similar but not identical to the  effect of the stronger gene.
Image of page 3
Image of page 4

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture