I am not saying everyone who has listened to hip hop disrespects women but some

I am not saying everyone who has listened to hip hop

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I am not saying everyone who has listened to hip hop disrespects women but some of the people do. Dionne Stephens mentions that there have been some sexual scripts describing women in hip hop & rap songs which have been “the Diva, Gold Digger, Freak, Dyke, Gangster Bitch, Sister Savior, and Baby Mama” (48). The Diva means being pretty, the Diva script is commonly applied to women who appear independent and select partners that bolsters social status and provides companionships (51). The Gold Digger term is towards women who uses sex to gain material and economic rewards (clothes, money, etc.) (51). The Freak is known as the “bad girl” who gains male attention through an overt sexual persona. She appears sexually liberated and seeks sex solely for physical satisfaction, not for a relationship (52). Dyke is referred to women who choose not to engage in sexual acts with men and enter relationships exclusively (52). Gangster Bitch is a term used for women who live in the drug-infested, violent environments that focus on the endangered African Male. Sexuality not only becomes a tool to please men, but to prove their loyalty to them (52). The Baby Mama is a woman who is the mother of a man’s baby and nothing more. The Baby Mama purposely becomes pregnant so that she could maintain a relationship while making the biological father financially indebted to her (52). Rap and hip hop music contain a large amount of violence. In a study done by Catherine R. Squires instructor for the Afro-American and African Studies, at the University of Michigan, she found out that many rap lyrics actually provide “justification for violence on the street and a direct link to use violence” (728). About 65% of all rap songs in her study referenced a violent theme and violent a retaliation was found in 58% of the sample. Catherine also found that
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8 listeners hold a “street code” as a normal order to life and that rap lyrics are “reproductions of the code that describe black urban street life” (730) She argues it is important to realize that rap is a characterization of urban life. It is clear that as conditions in the inner city have gotten worse in the last 10 years, “the popularity of the street code has risen” (731). Catherine also states that these conditions have “defined the context in which rap has emerged” (733). Hip hop has done a cultural impact on society and one of the examples is during the Presidency of Barack Obama. Dr. Sanford K. Richmond, PhD in Education at Washington State University and has a Masters in Cinema-Television from the University from South California. Conducted a study as an analysis that focused on the public discourse surrounding the relationship that emerged between Barack Obama and hip-hop culture throughout his first presidential campaign in 2008. When Obama won the Presidency, defeating Republican Senator, John McCain “there were many sources associating hip hop with this victory” (250). Obama had met with Ludacris a hip hop artist back in 2006, to help with Ludacris’ campaign “kick me”; a campaign that was motivated to raise HIV/AIDS awareness among inner city youth” (250).
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