Enough that the data in the surveys is not based upon

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enough that the data in the surveys is not based upon population counts, but rather sample data. Because “when the righteous increase, the people rejoice, but when the wicked rule, the people groan” (King James Bible, 1769/2017,Proverbs 29:2) Additionally, inside the article entitled “Snitches End Up in Ditches’ and Other Cautionary Tales” is disheartening and should encourage school leadership to act. I believe , especially for students who live in a community that lives by such mantras , alternate and inventive means of disclosure are necessary. Not only are bystanders hesitate to seek assistance from an adult, but so are victims because they stated being harmed but did seek help, which is basically the same thing (Morris, 2010). Moreover, It seems unfortunate that such an approachable criminal justice system has existed for so long and no one seems to mind . I believe that o ne approach that could be utilized by school leadership is an “anonymous” drop box located in multiple locations throughout the school. In some instances, students may not be opposed to “snitching”, but rather it being known it was them who brought it to the attention of an adult. Having the ability to report incidents anonymously could increase reporting in hopes that adults would take serious and appropriate action. Leverage the justices and repercussions brought to offenders and peace to those victimized. What do you believe should be done to increase reporting outcomes in schools and the community? How can society get rid of the snitches get stitches mantra? From your perspective, what should be the first step in revamping the NCVS? Why or why not? Explain. References King James Bible. (2017). King James Bible Online. (Original work published 1769) Morris, E.W. (2010), “Snitches end up in ditches” and other cautionary tales. Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice, 26 (3). 254-272. DOI: 10.1177/1043986210368640.
DB #6 Replies Reply #1: In 2013, the Pennsylvania Department of Corrections published one of the most comprehensive analyses of state recidivism information to date.a The department used multiple definitions of success, including time to failure and offense severity, and measured recidivism rates at several time intervals over a 20-year period. Detailed in a report containing more than 50 tables and charts, the analysis includes recidivism rates by geographic area, demographic characteristic, offense severity, and release type as well as the cost savings associated with various recidivism and imprisonment reduction goals. The department also compared “risk- adjusted” recidivism rates for inmates released to Community Corrections Centers (e.g., halfway houses) with those paroled directly to the street and found that their recidivism rates were higher. By controlling for factors “such as age, race, prior criminal history, and risk score,” and comparing expected rates of reoffending to actual recidivism rates, the department confirmed its finding that the use of halfway houses was not having the intended recidivism reduction effect.

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