Hematoma localized collection of blood underneath the

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Hematoma- localized collection of blood underneath the tissue Dehiscence- partial or total separation of wound layers
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Skills Test 3 With total separation of wound layers Evisceration (protrusion of visceral organs through a wound opening) sometimes occurs. An evisceration is an emergency situation. To care for an evisceration, cover the wound with a sterile towel that has been moistened with warm sterile saline solution. Release tension on the wounded area. UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES should you attempt to push the organs back into the abdominal cavity. If the worst case scenario has happened and loops of intestine have pushed out of the incision, gather them in the wet sheet or bandage and keep the patient calm and seated or lying down. Fistula- abnormal passage between two organs or between and organ and the outside of the body. Norton Scale- scores five risk factors: physical condition, mental condition, activity, mobility, and incontinence. Score range from 5-20 , lower score higher risk for pressure ulcer development Braden Scale- was developed based on risk factors in a nursing home population. Composed of 6 subscales: Sensory perception, moisture, activity (LOC), mobility, nutrition, and friction and shear. Scores Range 6-23, lower score /higher risk, cutoff score for risk in general population is 18 Chapter 40 Oxygenation Apnea: absence of respirations Dyspnea: clinical sign of hypoxia; subjective sensation of difficult or uncomfortable breathing; shortness of breath usually associated with exercise or excitement; occurs in pregnant women in final months; environmental factors can worsen Orthopnea: difficulty breathing while lying down. abnormal condition in which the client uses multiple pillows when lying down or must sit with the arms elevated and leaning forward to breathe; number of pillows used to quantify dyspnea Atelectasis: when the alveoli of the lungs are unable to inflate all the way (think little balloons...and the incentive spirometer ties into this because a balloon is easier and easier to blow up the more it’s stretched out..which is what the incentive spirometer does..that’s how Dubert explained it to my campus clinical group) Bradypnea: RR<10 Tachypnea: RR>35 Eupnea: normal breathing Bronchoscopy: for both diagnostic testing and treatment CPT (Chest PhysioTherapy): beating on the chest using that cupping method...it’s to break apart build-up in the lungs Postural Drainage: we don't need to worry about positions but... just letting gravity drain the fluid/build-up from the lungs Chest Percussion: cupping Vibration: literally shaking pressure during expiration Chest Tubes: you hook these up to the under-water seal ( Pleur-evac ) and the amount of suction is indicated by the level in the canister (pg 962)
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Skills Test 3 Cyanosis: blue discoloration of the skin and mucous membranes caused by the presence of desaturated hemoglobin in the capillaries; late sign of hypoxia (central or peripheral) Practice breathing exercises: - deep breathing and coughing (effective for maintaining patent airway)
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