The independent coder had extensive experience in

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categories that best describe the data (Thomas, 2006). The independent coder had extensive experience in participating in and conducting qualitative research. The categories created by the two researchers were compared as a check of the dependability of the results. In the event that major discrepancies existed, the primary researcher re-
102 evaluated his analysis in light of the discrepant findings. Finally, a detailed account of data collection and analysis procedures (e.g., duration of interviews, recruitment, initial and changing conceptualizations of codes) was kept in an audit trail (see Appendix E) as a final method of enhancing the credibility of the study (Morrow & Smith, 2000).
CHAPTER 4 RESULTS Quantitative Phase The quantitative phase of this study was guided by three research questions: (a) How much SRG do Division I athletes report in response to sport stressors? (b) What is the relationship between stressor factors and cognitive appraisals, and SRG? and (c) What differences exist between Division I athletes on SRG? Descriptive statistics were calculated to gain a basic understanding of these data. Secondly, multiple linear and binary logistic regressions were conducted in order to examine relationships, group differences, and the predictive power of the demographic, stressor-related, and cognitive appraisal variables. Descriptive Statistics Means and standard deviations were calculated for all continuous independent variables. The athletes reported a small to moderate degree of positive change as a result of their most difficult sport stressor in the last three years (M= 2.70, SD = 1.05). Less than half (43%) of the athletes reported at least a moderate degree of SRG. The athletes believed that their chosen sport-related stressor was quite stressful when it occurred (M= 5.50, SD = 1.19), but less stressful currently (M= 3.12, SD = 1.78). The athletes felt moderately aware (M= 4.12, SD = 2.16) and in control (M= 3.47, SD = 1.77) of the
104 occurrence of their stressor, and reported that their stressor was moderately resolved (M= 4.54, SD= 1.71). Multiple Linear Regression Following preliminary data screening, 16 variables were ultimately chosen for entry into the hierarchical regression model. Demographic variables accounted for 4.5% of the variance in SRG (Adj R 2 = .028, p < .05). Stressor factors added an additional 8.2% (p < .001). Finally, the block of cognitive appraisal variables accounted for 4.8% of the variance (p < .05). The final model was significant, F (15, 272) = 3.58, p < .001, and accounted for 17.4% (Adj R 2 = .126,/? < .001) of the PTGI variance. Specifically, being older (sr = .163, p = .180,/? < .01), being female (sr = -.128, p - -.143,/? < .05), not reporting the most difficult sport stressor in the past 3 years to be related to the negative aspects of competition (sr = -.179, P = -.220,/? < .01), or negative significant other relationships (sr = -.112, p = -.121,/? < .01), feeling more stress currently (sr = .137, p = .217, p < .05), feeling more in control of the stressor (sr = .112, p = .126, p < .05), and feeling that the stressor was more resolved (sr = .113, P = .148,/? < .05) were related to more SRG (see Table 2).

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