Killing_us_softly_Investigating_in_the_aesthetics_philosophy_and_influence_of_Nordic_Noir_television

According to sveistrup longer scenes are regarded as

Info icon This preview shows pages 20–23. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
to breathe and to linger on deeper philosophical concerns. According to Sveistrup, ‘longer scenes’ are ‘[…] regarded as important for getting an epic element into the story of a number of characters, whose lives are suddenly all part of the same “drama of destinies”’ (cited by Redvall 2013b: 174). It is this epic ‘drama of destinies’ that Nordic Noir meticulously creates and from which television outside of Scandinavia is now also learning so much. Conclusion 20
Image of page 20

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Writing of True Detective , Robert Lloyd praised its format, arguing that we are ‘seeing the return of the miniseries, reborn out of the seasonal long arc of the 8-to-13-hour dramatic serial’ (2014). In contrast to the continuous series, the miniseries has a clearly defined beginning, middle and end. While it may well possess more than one season, each one will conclude with a finalè which brings that particular story to a satisfactory conclusion (see Creeber 2004: 7-12). 29 That rarely happened in a show like The Sopranos (1999-2007) where its only conclusion came at the end of the final sixth season (which some critics felt was less than satisfying [see Zeller-Jacques 2014]). Endings are important because they allow a drama to make a final statement, to wrap up loose ends, offer some kind of closure and perhaps even hint at a moral conclusion (as in Rust and Marty’s closing conversation). They also invest all the proceeding episodes with retrospective meaning, allowing its complex trail to finally come to a conclusion, answering many (if not all) of the questions the story initially posed. This is one of the reasons why this new breed of miniseries is so popular, its structure encouraging its audience to invest in an often rich and complex narrative arc, a process that is undertaken in the safe knowledge that they will eventually be rewarded. After some twenty or more episodes, it is what the contemporary television viewer now increasingly demands and deserves. Nordic Noir has played a crucial role in helping to create this new dramatic format. While it could be argued that there are already enough detective dramas on TV, the central crime at the heart of each narrative is simply a motor that enables the whole narrative world to revolve. The two detectives provide a love story of sorts, the murders represent social problems and the criminals symbolise the evils that threaten to destroy society. As proven by 29 Interestingly, critics have argued that True Detective lost out to Breaking Bad (2008-13) in the 2014 Emmys because it was put in the ‘Drama Series’ section rather than the ‘Miniseries’ (see Ben Travers 2014). This just shows how tenuous these categories are. However, as a self-contained series, I would argue that it is clearly more of a miniseries or serial than a drama series. 21
Image of page 21
their international remakes and adaptations, the stories are universal and they talk to their audience with an intelligence that forces them to slowly and painstakingly work for the pleasures they provide. Although the crimes will eventually be solved, the moral, political and social problems that produced them are not.
Image of page 22

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 23
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern