In job sharing two or more persons split one full time job This can be done for

In job sharing two or more persons split one full

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In job sharing, two or more persons split one full-time job. This can be done, for example, on a half day, weekly, or monthly basis. ... work sharing. This occurs when workers agree to cut back on the number of hours they work in order to protect against layoff s. ... Telecommuting is work done at home or in a remote location via the use of computers, tablets, and smart phone connections with bosses, co-workers, and customers. CHAPTER 7 – REVIEW team - a group of people brought together to use their complementary skills to achieve a common purpose for which they are collectively accountable ... Real teamwork occurs when team members accept and live up to their collective accountability by actively working together so that all of their respective skills are best used to achieve team goals ... teams that recommend things, run things, and make or do things are set up to study specific problems and recommend solutions for them Teams that run things lead organizations and their component parts. A good example is a top-management team composed of a CEO and other senior executives. Key issues addressed by top-management teams include identifying overall organizational purposes, goals, and values as well as crafting strategies and persuading others to support them. Teams that make or do things are work units that perform ongoing tasks such as marketing, sales, systems analysis, manufacturing, or working on special projects with assigned due dates. Members of these action teams must have good working relationships with one another, the right technologies and operating systems, and the external support needed to achieve performance effectiveness over the long term or within an assigned deadline ... The many formal teams found in organizations are created and officially designated to serve specific purposes. Some are permanent and appear on organization charts as departments (e.g., market research department), divisions (e.g., consumer products division), or teams (e.g., product-assembly team). Such teams can vary in size from very small departments or teams consisting of just a few people to large divisions employing 100 or more people. Other formal teams are temporary and short lived. They are created to solve specific problems or perform defined tasks and are then disbanded once the purpose has been accomplished. Examples include temporary committees and task forces ... Organizations also have vast networks of informal groups, which emerge and coexist as a shadow to the formal structure and without any assigned purpose or official endorsement ... Interest groups consist of persons who share job-related interests, such as an intense desire to learn more about computers, or non work interests, such as community service, sports, or religion. ... A tool known as social network analysis is used to identify the informal groups and networks of relationships that are active in an organization. The analysis typically asks people to identify co-workers who most often help them, who communicate with them regularly, and who motivate and demotivate them. When these social networks are
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