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Figure 4.2: Years of experience in teaching TEFigure 4.3 (on page 93) indicates that the majority of the teachers (33.3%) haveonly been teaching TE for 24 years. This may be due to the fact that teachersare moved from one subject to another especially in the primary schools(Rambrij, 2006:112). This is normally the period it takes for a teacher to developexpertise and become a specialist in this subject.Rambrij (2006:117) statesthat the long term survival of TE depends on human resources such as trainedteachers with specialised content knowledge. The ideal situation in schools
Chapter 493should be to allow the teacher qualified in a subject to keep on teaching thespecific subject. By changing the teacher, the skills and knowledge for thatsubject are lost.Figure 4.3: Qualifications in TEFigure 4.4 (on page 94) shows that 74.6% of the teachers attending theworkshop came from rural schools, 11,4% from city schools, 7% from cityschools, 2.6% from former model C schools, 2.6% from independent schoolsand 1.8% from farm schools. This indicates that the need for training might behigher in rural schools. This attendance is a common trend in the sixteen yearsof existence of the TASA. Due to a shortage of manpower and time, theexecutive committee of the TASA only runs workshops once a term in Durban.Some of the regular attendees of the workshop expressed their concern aboutthe low level of support in implementing TE in the rural areas (teachersinterviewed in 2011 at a TASA workshop). They feel that the subject advisors do
Chapter 494not visit them often enough for support, and due to inadequate resources it isvery difficult to implement TE in the rural schools.Statistics regarding infra-structure of KZN schools conducted in 2006 indicatedthat there were 5928 public schools in the province of KZN, of which 4639 of theschools was without libraries, 3080 schools without laboratories, 1586 schoolshad no electricity, and 607 had no waterthis indicates the lack of resources inKZN schools (interview with the Manager for Infrastructure in KZN schools,2011). Without these basic resources the researcher assumes that the otherresources such as textbooks and equipment for the teaching of TE were also notpresent. TE is a practical subject and needs to be taught in a project-basedmanner (DoE, 2002). Without the necessary resources, TE cannot beimplemented in a constructive way.Figure 4.4: Context of the schools
Chapter 495Table 4.3 (below) indicates that the majority (44.7%) of the teachers attendingthe workshop came from the Ilembe district, followed by the Umgungundlovudistrict with 22.8%. The data-base of the members of the TASA shows the sametrend.In 2010, 40% of the members were from Ilembe, 30% fromUmgungundluvu and the other 30% consisted of members from other districtsand the Eastern Cape. The subject advisors of Ilembe and Umgungundlovu aremembers of the executive committee of the TASA. As such, the researcherassumes that they therefore promote the work done by the association in theirdistricts. In the Ilembe and Umgungundlovu districts, circulars are posted at thecircuit offices in the pigeon holes of all the schools which are an effective way ofdistribution.

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