Content schema content schema refers to knowledge

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Content schema Content schema refers to knowledge about the subject matter or content of a text. TEXT STRUCTURE Text Structure Background Text structure refers to how the information within a written text is organized. This strategy helps students understand that a text might present a main idea and details; a cause and then its effects; and/or different views of a topic. Teaching students to recognize common text structures can help students monitor their comprehension. Benefits Teachers can use this strategy with the whole class, small groups, or individually. Students learn to identify and analyze text structures which helps students navigate the various structures presented within nonfiction and fiction text. As a follow up, having students write paragraphs that follow common text structures helps students recognize these text structures when they are reading. Create and Use the Strategy To create the text structure strategy teachers should: 1. Choose the assigned reading and introduce the text to the students. 2. Introduce the idea that texts have organizational patters called text structures. 3. Introduce the following common text structures (see chart below for more detailed information): o description, o sequence, o problem and solution, o cause and effect, and o compare and contrast. 4. Introduce and model using a graphic organizer to chart the text structure. To use the text structure strategy teachers should: 1. Show examples of paragraphs that correspond to each text structure. 2. Examine topic sentences that clue the reader to a specific structure. 3. Model the writing of a paragraph that uses a specific text structure. 4. Have students try write paragraphs that follow a specific text structure. 5. Have students diagram these structures using a graphic organizer.
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Textual types refer to the following four basic aspects of writing: descriptive , narrative , expository , and argumentative . Descriptive text type[ edit ] Based on perception in space. Impressionistic of landscapes or persons are often to be found in narratives such as novels or short stories . Example: About fifteen miles below Monterey, on the wild coast, the Sido family had their farm, a few sloping acres above the cliff that dropped to the brown reefs and to the hissing white waters of the ocean. Purpose Description is used in all forms of writing to create a vivid impression of a person, place, object or event e.g. to: describe a special place and explain why it is special. describe the most important person in your life. Descriptive writing is usually used to help a writer develop an aspect of their work, e.g. to create a particular mood, atmosphere or describe a place so that the reader can create vivid pictures of characters, places, objects etc.
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  • Summer '18
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