example Hazpak has controls on one side that include an extra table for needs

Example hazpak has controls on one side that include

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example, Hazpak has controls on one side that include an extra table for needs medical attention and days off instead of writing it off as a low risk. It only utilises a level 1 – 6 approach instead of 1 – 3, in which one means needs immediate attention and action, and six meaning that it is not priority. (appendix 3). Hazpak focuses more on a collaborative response, (which the OHSE has elements too), and also a more documented process as a way to monitor and review management proves. Hazpak’s hierarchy of control is similar as it also adopts NSW WHS legislation which recognizes the five means of controlling risks, in order of effectiveness according to the WHS Regulation clause 5. Limitations in this risk model is that it adopts a single theory model in which you can only isolate one hazard at a time, and not have multiple hazards that can contribute to a huge risk. Also, as this ismore group based in determining the risk controls and hazards, the subject or effectiveness of this tool could be quite subjective and might not always reflect the true risk or likelihood of injury and therefore the way in which thehazard is to be controlled.
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Appendices for Assessment 2 Slip /Trip / Fall – Hazard Report Introduction This report will endeavour to explain how a hazard can cause serious injury to a worker and how this can happen in the workplace. Within this report we will look at how hazards in the work environment mixed with a worker doing repetitive tasks can increase the risk of injury within the warehouse environment and ways in which they can be eliminated using the hierarchy of control. This was observed when performing an audit of a warehouse with 25 staff, 4 contractors and 2 managers. Body The likelihood of a worker tripping, slipping or falling is increased in the warehouse due to the repetitiveness of the role or even familiarity to the role, which can sometimes cause people to not consider the risks as they become accustomed to stock and goods. This is evidenced in a report by Safe work Australia which stated that 20.7% of all injuries to the knee, 16.7% of injuries to the ankle and 12.6% of injuries to the back where caused by a slip, trip or fall in the workplace environment. The most common injury can include muscoskeletal injuries (MSD strategy for Safe work NSW was created to run until 2022), cuts, sprains, bruises, fractures and dislocation, and even in extreme cases fatality or serious injury. Hazard / Risk To understand the gravity of the PCBU’s responsibilities, we need to understand the definition of hazard and risks before identifying them in the workplace. A hazard is anything in the work practises or procedures that may cause potential harm to the health and safety of a worker, whereas risk is the likelihood that harm will occur from exposure to, or as a result from the hazard. PCBU’s must be reasonably practicable to ensure the safety of everyone on the workplace.
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