d he ri h d a ched toward the town by files rill we came co he We chen face to

D he ri h d a ched toward the town by files rill we

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d he ri h d a ched toward the town by files, rill we came co [he We chen face to r e rig t, an m r Plains of Abraham: an even piece of ground which Mr. [British General James] Wolfe had made choice of, while we stood forming upon the hill. Weather showery; about six o'clock [a.m.] the enemy first made their appearance upon the heights, between us and the town; whereupon we halted, and wheeled to the right, thereby forming the line of battle. About eight o'clock we had rwo pieces of short brass six-pounders playing on the enemy, which threw them into some confusion, and obliged them to alter their disposi- tion and Montcalm [the French commander] formed them into three large columns; about nine the two armies moved a little nearer each other .... About ten o'clock the enemy began to advance briskly in three columns, with loud shouts and recovered arms, rwo of them inclining to the left of our army, and the third towards our right, firing obliquely at the two extremities of our line, (rom the distance of one hundred and thirty, until they came within ferry, yards; which our troops withstood with the greatest intrepidity and firmness, still reserving their fire, and paying the strictest obedience to their officers. This uncommon steadiness. togech- er with the havoc which the grapeshot from our fieldpieces made among them, threw them into some disorder, and was most critically maintained by a well-timed, regular. and heavy discharge of our small arms, such as they could no longer oppose. Hereupon they gave way, and fled with precipitation, so that, by the time the cloud o( smoke was vanished, our men were again loaded, and, profiring by rhe advantage we had over them, pursued them almost [Q the gates of the town and the bridge over the little river. redoubling our fire with great eagerness, making many officers and men pnsoners. An HistoricalJournal of the Campaigns in North America for the Yea~ 1757. , 758. 1759. and 1761J. Vol. I,ed Arthur G. Doughty (Toronto: Champlain Society, 1914-16), Vol. II,pp. 94-101. THE SEVEN YEARS' WAR AND THE GROWTH OF ANTISLAVERY SENTIMENT 5/ "Tlwugh we made slaves of 'he Negroes...I believed ,hat l.ibeTty wasthenatural right of aU men equally" Durin~ the eighteenth century Great Britain dominated the Atlantic slave trade. Exports of Mncans, during 'he 1700s, exceeded 6 million, three times the number shipped between 1450 and 1700. Of these, 2.9 million were shipped by Englishmen or Anglo- Amencans. During the eighteenth century, the slave trade become One of Britain's largest and most profitable industries By id . . . rru -cenrury a third of the British merchant fleet was engaged in rransporring 50000 M. 1 d Cleans a year to the New World. But it was nor just save tra ers or planters who benefited from the slave trade Ameri h. L ers d f h . encan s rpoweers HUm- l an IS errnan also profited from sl Sl ' of commercial . ali . h avery. avery played a central role in the growth capir sm tn t e colonies. The slave plantations of the West Indies became
THE SEVEN YEARS' WAR 133 the largest market for American fish, oats, corn, flour, lumber, peas, beans, hogs, and horses. And New Englanders distilled molasses produced by slaves in rhe French and

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