Memory management like all modern operating systems

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Memory Management Like all modern operating systems, Mac OS X employs both physical and virtual memory. The system has a virtual memory manager that creates virtual space for each process and divides them into sets of data. Each set of data is the same size (Developer, 2015). Because each set of data is the same size regardless of its content, it makes managing the system more efficient because the size is already pre- determined. The processor has a memory management unit that maintains a page table to map pages in the program’s logical address space to hardware addresses in the computers RAM. Process Management Programs on a computer consist of several threads. A single process can contain multiple threads. Each thread identifies a process to run when the program
UNIX/Linux vs. Mac vs. Windows OS calls upon it. Within the OS X operating system, processes start up in their own address space (Levin, 2015). Apple has developed a technology called Grand Central Dispatch (GCD) to manage applications and systems with multi-core processors. Grand Central Dispatch provides a pool of available threats ready to be executed. OS X sections applications into blocks. The system can dispatch them independently and run them concurrently of one another (Stallings, 2015). Each block is a self-contained unit of work. OS X schedules and dispatches them through a queue following the first- in-first-out model. File Management Apple’s OS X Operating systems uses a hierarchical file system. It uses a tree structure to organize files and directories. The OS uses the first-in-first-out model to open files as opposed to opening the easiest to open request. Security Any application created for OS X must be secured. Apple encourages developers to sign their applications and authenticate their identity (Levin, 2015). If an unsigned application tries to execute on the system, the OS’s kernel will terminate the process of the unsigned code. The only way to exploit this system is by attacking an existing, signed application on the computer. OS X also uses a permissions and rights service to protect the integrity, privacy, and fair use of the Mac’s resources. Requests to the system must first pass through a security check handled by the systems kernel. Each request will contain various permissions that will allow it to proceed, or the kernel will terminate the process (Levin, 2015). Another security feature that OS X utilizes is
UNIX/Linux vs. Mac vs. Windows OS address pace layout randomization. The binary code from a program will load from a random address space in RAM. This makes the way applications and process running on the system unpredictable to a virus or hacker. They will not be able to exploit a program as easily because it is not consistent in its execution.

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