Stoppard sets Arcadia in two different time periods both evolving around the

Stoppard sets arcadia in two different time periods

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Stoppard sets* Arcadia in two different* time periods, both evolving around the Scholars at Sidley Park. The setting, which remains the same in each timeline eventually leads to the clashing of past and present; allowing both eras to occupy* the same* space* and dialogue. The jam pudding that Thomasina stirs, becomes a symbolic undertone in understanding Stoppard’s theoretical point of view of time. The pudding itself represents the natural progress that occurs from order to disorder. As Thomasina stirs the jam, it begins to separate; trails of substance start* to reflect the movement of disorder throuogh the inability to redirect or separate what has already occurred. Valentine, whom is a modern relative of Thomasina, also agrees with this belief; suggesting that disorder and chaos is just as relevant in the reality of ‘order.’ For him, the jam has no reversal method, which is also implicated by the idea imposed by Stoppard, that “Your tea gets cold by itself, it doesn’t get hot by itself***** Although the perspectives of Thomasina and Valentine encourage* a widening* idea of ‘order’ in existence, it seems that Lady Croom’s ideal* on Sidley Park directly correlates with the understanding that nature itself should be ordered. Here, God is considered to be of a Newtonian complex – “regularized to conform to a human vision of what gods creation should be: orderly, linear, geometrical****” Not only does Stoppard use* the setting, characters, and themes as a way to portray these theories, but the conclusion of Arcadia also simulates the same idea. The main objective for Stoppard seems to exist in the mind of the reader. Although there is a format projected onto the story itself, the meaning inferred by time evolves through theory of one’s own opinion. The contrast between this and the play’s alteration
between historical periods suggests* that order then, is an interpretation* imposed* on events* rather than the inherent* of the events themselves. Although the correlation of past and present is heavily* enveloped in both Stoppard’s and Wilson’s work, the techniques used to depict these features are applied differently*. In “Fences,” time is enrolled* through sequences of recollection and referral. The past and present is contrasted as a tool in the development of Troy Maxson’s character and to underline the symbolism of his relationships. Wilson enrolls the idea that the past is influential on the present, while Stoppard highlights the unpredictability of these roles despite its overall influence. In “Arcadia” the past and present are directly attached* to the idea of order and disorder. The past is not an idea that is easily ossified* in the parallels of time; it is something that must be thought* through with specificity and motivation* .

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