One was General MacArthur felt that air power alone could force a Japanese

One was general macarthur felt that air power alone

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One was, General MacArthur felt that air power alone could force a Japanese surrender within six months with little risk to American lives. However, it was also argued that this may be a best case scenario where in actuality it could take substantially longer. 24 The second alternative option was to allow the Japanese to retain the Emperor - This plan was predicated on mitigating the call for unconditional surrender by Japan. Both Secretary of War Stimson and Acting Secretary of State Grew felt that this was an essential policy because of the dedication and fanaticism of the Japanese people towards the Emperor Hirohito, whom the Japanese believed to be a deity. 25 The final option that was discussed was waiting on the Soviet Union to enter the war. This was President Roosevelt’s primary objective, they Committee believed that a Soviet invasion of Manchuria would be helpful but not decisive by itself. 26 Feis, also discussed the alternative options to bombing both cities given out by the Interim Committee, with each of these option produced more questions. 27 Including the most important, would it end the war sooner? This event will always have controversy surrounding it. Historians will always try to answer the questions of whether the United States government was justified in dropping the 24 Donohue, Nathan. “Understanding the Decision to Drop the Bomb on Hiroshima and Nagasaki,” CSIS. Last modified August 10, 2012. Accessed, January 23, 2015. understanding-decision- drop-bomb-hiroshima-and-nagasaki. 25 Ibid. 26 Donohue, Nathan. “Understanding the Decision to Drop the Bomb on Hiroshima and Nagasaki,” CSIS. Last modified August 10, 2012. Accessed, January 23, 2015. understanding-decision- drop-bomb-hiroshima-and-nagasaki. 27 Feis, Herbert. "The Atomic Bomb and the End of World War II." Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1966. 11 | P a g e
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bombs. There will also always be controversy on how close Japan was to surrendering before the bombing of both Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Some historians like Miscamble will believe that there was no reason to believe that Japan was close to surrender before to the bombing. While others like Bird and Sherwin will believe the bombings were both unnecessary. The only thing that we, as historians, can do now is make sure that we continue to talk about both sides, so that if this situation ever arises again in the future we can look at the past to make a very educational decision as a country. Work Cited: Bird, Kia, and Martin Sherwin. "The Myths of Hiroshima." Los Angeles Times. August 5, 2005. Accessed February 25, 2015. . Donohue, Nathan. “Understanding the Decision to Drop the Bomb on Hiroshima and Nagasaki,” CSIS. Last modified August 10, 2012. Accessed, January 23, 2015.
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