Xx altitude measurement tests in addition to rtcado

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(xx) Altitude Measurement Tests . In addition to RTCA/DO 208, the following requirements and tests apply to equipment which uses altitude-aiding. If alternative algorithms or test procedures are to be used, the manufacturer shall establish a set of tests acceptable to and approved by the cognizant Aircraft Certification Office and demonstrate equivalent performance with those tests. Page 16    (a)(3)(vii)   Error Type Oceanic (nm) En Route (random or J/V routes) (nm) Terminal (nm) Non-Precision Approach (nm) Position fixing error* 0.124 0.124 0.124 0.056 CDI Centering** 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.01
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TSO-C129a 1. "2.5.2.5.3.8. Tests to Verify that Altitude Measurement is Properly Incorporated ." a. As stated in paragraph 2.5.2.5.1, all tests described in paragraph 2.5.2.5 apply to GPS equipment that employs a snapshot-type RAIM integrity algorithm that uses pseudorange measurements from GPS satellites either singly or in conjunction with an altitude input. The following on-line tests shall be performed to verify that the altitude measurement is properly incorporated. Tests should start early enough for the receiver to settle before each of the specified test periods begins. b. All tests shall be conducted using the Optimal 21 constellation as described in Appendix I of RTCA/DO-208 for July 1, 1990. Test times are with respect to the GPS epoch time described in the same appendix. Note that the angle from the vernal equinox to the Greenwich meridian at GPS time 0:00 on July 1, 1990 is 278.8 ° , which must be taken into account when determining the position of satellites in an earth- centered, earth-fixed coordinate system. i. For equipment which uses pressure altitude with local barometric correction as an optional input for GPS navigation and RAIM, conduct static tests with initial conditions as follows: 1Page 17
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TSO-C129a Test No. Location (Lat/Long) Geomet ric Altitude (Feet)* Integrity Alarm Limit (nm) Initial Space Vehicle (SV) Pseudorange Error (Meters)** Failed SV Initial Altitude Error (Meters)** * 1 42 ° N/87.5 ° W 18,000 2.0 SV12 & SV16: -33 SV14 & SV20: +33 SV3 -477 2 42 ° N/87.5 ° W 18,000 2.0 SV9, SV14 & SV20: +33 SV12, SV16: -33 SV3 0 3 34 ° N/118 ° W 10,000 1.0 SV5, SV10, & SV15: +33 SV7: -33 SV4 -290 4 34 ° N/118 ° W 10,000 1.0 SV5, SV10 & SV15: +33 SV7 & SV12: -33 SV4 0 5 33 ° N/97 ° W 1,000 0.3 SV3, SV10 & SV21: +33 SV5: -33 SV2 -34 6 33 ° N/97 ° W 1,000 0.3 SV3, SV10 & SV21: +33 SV5 & SV15: -33 SV2 0 7 30 ° N/90 ° W 200 0.3 SV5, SV10 & SV17: +33 SV12: -33 SV15 -12 8 30 ° N/90 ° W 200 0.3 SV5, SV10 & SV17: +33 SV7 & SV12: -33 SV15 0 * Geometric altitude is the highest above the surface of the WGS-84 ellipsoid at the present position (latitude and longitude). ** A positive SV error causes an observed pseudorange which is smaller than the actual distance from the receiver to the SV. *** A positive altitude error causes a barometric altitude which is higher than the geometric altitude. ii. For these tests, the receiver is fixed at the geometric location and altitude specified and the SVs change their orbital positions. The "Failed SV" for each test must not provide any signals to the receiver for the duration of the test. If an initial error is not specified for a space vehicle (SV) pseudorange measurement, the error for the test for those SVs should be set to zero.
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