Transparent eyeball iam nothing iseeallthe

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transparent eyeball; Iam nothing; Iseeall;the currentsoftheUniversal Beingcirculate through me;Iam partorparcel ofGod." (from Emerson, Essays) Q How does Emerson's approach to nature compare with Wordsworth's?
CHAPTER TWELVE ROMANTICISM' NATURE. PASSION. AND THE SUBLIME 335 Ideas and Issues THOREAU: NATURE AS TEACHER UI went to the ~oods because Iwished to live deliberately, to front onlythe essential facts of life, and see if Icould not learn what it had t~ teach, ~nd not, when Icame to die, discover that Ihad not lived. I didn?t WIS~ to H.vewhat was not life,livingisso dear; nor did J wish to practice restgnanon, unless it w~s qUit~ necessary. Iwanted to live deep and suckout allthe marrow of life, to live so sturdily and Spartan-like as to put to rout allthat was not life, to cut a broad swath and shave close,to drive lifeinto a corner, and reduce it to its lowest terms and if it ~rovedto be mean, why then to get the whole and genuine meanness of rt,and publish its meanness to the world; or if it were sublime to know it byexperience, and be able to give a true account of it inmy next excurs~on.Formo~t ~en, it appears to me, are in astrange uncertainty about It,whether It ISof the devil or of God, and have somewhat hastily concluded that it isthe chief end of man here to 'glorify God and enjoy him forever," (from Thoreau, Walden) Q What were Thoreau's aims and ambitions in retreating to Walden Pond? Unitarian minister when he was inhis twenties. Like Words- worth, hecourted nature to "see into the life of things" and to taste its cleansing power. In the essay entitled "Nature" (1836), Emer- son sets forth a pantheistic credo: Becoming one with nature, we find true happiness. Emerson's friend Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) carried Transcendentalism to its logical end by literally returning to nature. He completed a degree at Harvard University and made his way in the world by tutoring, surveying, and making pencils. An avid opponent of slav- ery,he was jailed briefly for refusing to pay a poll tax to a pro-slavery government. In an influential essay on civil disobedience, Thoreau defends the philosophy of passive resistance and moral idealism that he himself practiced- a philosophy embraced by the twentieth-century leaders Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi and Martin Luther King. In 1845 Thoreau abandoned urban society to live in the Massachusetts woods near Walden Pond-an experin1ent that lasted twenty-six months. He describes his love of the natural world, his nonconformist attitude toward society, and his deep commitment to monkish simplicity in his "handbook for living," called Walden, Thoreau, Walden or Llifie in the Woods. In this intimate (1854) I if yet forthright diary Thoreau g or res nature as innocent and beneficent-a source of JOYand practical instruction.

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