Arrival of missionaries made marriage a la facon de la pays unacceptable White

Arrival of missionaries made marriage a la facon de

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Arrival of missionaries made marriage a la facon de la pays unacceptable - White woman symbolizing the shift from fur trade to settlement Changes in mid 19th century - Idea of Canadian expansion into the west - White women come to the prairies - Shift from fur trade to the settlement era - Invalidation of mixed marriages - By 1880s, many Indigenous women were left by their husbands - Women and their children excluded from positions of economic & social prestige - 1886 ruling Jones vs Fraser Frances Simpson gets married (Youtube Video) Revision 1850s - Henry Youle Hind expedition - Palliser’s Triangle - The west as arable land - Civilization over savagery - The west as the east’s inheritance - Changing ideas about the agricultural potential of the west: from barren cold wilderness to fertile garden - Two scientific expeditions (Henry Youle Hind & John Palliser – Palliser’s Triangle Confederation - Canada West (part of present day Ontario), Canada East (part of present day Quebec), Nova Scotia & New Brunswick – 1867 form Canada - With Confederation, Canada negotiates with Britain to takeover Rupert’s Land - 1869 - Three way deal: HBC surrenders control of the North West to British Government who then transferred it to Canada - British government paid £300 000 to the HBC - No consultation with the local inhabitants
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Metis Red River Resistance 1869 - Red River tradition of long narrow river farm lots - New square survey system - Oct. 11, survey crew barred when they tried to run a line across the farm of Andre Nault - William McDougall, first Lieutenant-Governor - Barred from the territory until Ottawa negotiated guarantees - Nov. 2 1869 armed men turned McDougall back at the American border & residents, led by Louis Riel, seized Fort Garry from the HBC, and took control of Red River - Métis ascendancy challenged by John Schultz, leader of a small group of Canadian expansionists - Métis call for provisional government chosen by the entire community - Attempt to impose Canadian authority led to arrests and jailing of Canadians in the cells at Fort Garry - Riel proclaims a provisional government - Meanwhile, Métis reps go Ottawa, negotiations begin - Canadians plan to free prisoners held at Fort Garry - Meanwhile, the prisoners had been released but the armed men that came to free them were caught & jailed - Thomas Scott refused to accept his imprisonment: an opponent of the provisional government, he assaulted & verbally abused his guards - Scott was tried for resistance and aim to overthrow the Provisional Government. He was sentenced and executed - Scott becomes of symbol – martyr (Orange Order member); Métis resistance at Red River trying to deny Protestant Ontario its rightful heritage to the west - Outcome of negotiations -
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