Bransford jd brown al cocking rr eds 2000 how people

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Bransford, J.D., Brown, A.L., & Cocking, R.R. (Eds.) (2000). How people learn: Brain, mind, Experience, and school. Washington, DC: The National Academy Press. Chapter 1, “Learning: From Speculation to Science” (pp. 3-28). Retrieved October 29, 2018, from - toc.Laureate Education (Producer). (2010b). Designing curriculum, instruction, and assessment:Education today [Video file]. Baltimore, MD: Author.Response to DiscussionSonya HighsmithSonya, after reading your post this week, I realized that we had similar experiences in Math. During my elementary years I felt that I had adequate skills to complete my math assignments. Ibegan to feel that math was overwhelming to me in junior high because I had a teacher that would try to make you feel less than a person if you made a mistake in the classroom. I never want to make my students to feel the way I did in class. I believe that if some of my teachers had been knowledgeable about the standards of teaching that was published by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM), they would have delivered mathematics in a way that I could have been grasped the concept. I agree that the students in the video was engaged in the activity and was very confident about what they were learning. They also felt confident to ask their teachers questions because they had gained a sense of trust in their teacher. As the authors, Walle, Karp and Bay-Williams state that “it becomes the job of every teacher of mathematics to prepare students with skills for potential careers and develop a “love of math” in students.” (Walle, Karp & Bay-Williams, 2016 p. 3).
ReferenceVan de Walle, J. A., Karp, K. S., & Bay-Williams, J. M. (2016). Elementary and middle schoolmathematics: Teaching developmentally (9th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Publication.

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