Survey a set of questions asked of a specific popula

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survey: a set of questions asked of a specific popula- tion to collect data for analysis. poll: a survey that measures attitudes and opinions. D-3273HTG Grades 9-10
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Lesson 5 Activity Worksheet Understanding Statistics Samples and Stats Sampling is a scientific technique used to obtain as accurate a figure or measurement as possible, when an exact count cannot be taken. By measuring a scientifically selected portion of a population, it is possible to describe the characteristics of the entire population. Below is a chart describing three different scientific sampling methods. The U.S. Census Bureau’s long form is an example of systematic sampling. For Census 2000, a systematic sampling of approximately 1 in every 6 households will receive the long form, and an average of 5 out of every 6 households will receive the short form. Although the long form doesn’t go to every household, information from these forms can be used to accurately describe the entire U.S. population. Here are three different sampling methods: Test your understanding of different sampling techniques. Draw lines to match the sampling methods with their types. 1. Choose any three pages from the telephone book at random, and call everyone on those pages. 2. Choose 100 telephone numbers at random from the entire book. 3. Choose every 100th listing in the telephone book. a. Random Sampling b. Systematic Sampling c. Cluster Sampling 16 Each individual in the population has an equal chance of being selected. Example: To take a random sample of students in your school, you could write the name of each student on a slip of paper, then choose slips at random. Groups, rather than individuals, are randomly selected. Example: You might randomly select certain classes, then interview every student in only those classes. A rule, or pattern, that applies to a population is used to make selections. Example: Using an alphabetical list of students, count off by 6, and select every 6th student on the list.
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