38 IRS 1E 20091993 Carried remote sensing payloads Could not be placed in orbit

38 irs 1e 20091993 carried remote sensing payloads

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38. IRS-1E 20.09.1993 Carried remote sensing payloads. Could not be placed in orbit. 39. IRS-P2 15.10.1994 Carried remote sensing payload. Launched by second developmental flight of PSLV. 40. IRS-1C 28.12.1995 Carries advanced remote sensing cameras. Launched by Russian Molniya launch vehicle. Still in service. 41. IRS-P3 21.03.1996 Carries remote sensing payload and an X-ray astronomy payload. Launched by third developmental flight of PSLV. Still in service. 42. IRS-1D 29.09.1997 Same as IRS-1C. Launched by India's PSLV service. In service. 43. IRS-P4 Oceansat 26.05.1999 Carries an Ocean Colour Monitor (OCM) and a Multi- frequency Scanning Microwave Radiometer (MSMR), Launched by India’s PSLV -C2, 44. Technology Experiment Satellite (TES) 22.10.2001 Technology Experiment Satellite Launched by PSLV-C3 . 45. IRS-P6 Resourcesat-1 17.10.2003 Launched by PSLV - C5, carries three camera, names, LISS- 4, LISS-3 and AwiFS
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14 Keplar's Laws of Planetary Motion Keplar devised three laws which describe the motions of the planets. Keplar's First Law Bodies move around the sun in elliptical orbits, with the sun at one focus. The other focus is empty. An ellipse is basically a squashed circle. All bodies orbit in an ellipse, although some are more elliptical than others. The Earth's average distance from the sun in 150 million km. However, at perihelion 1 it is 148 million km from the sun, and at aphelion 2 , 152 million km. THe amount which an ellipse deviates from a perfect circle can be measured by 'eccentricity'. The Earth has an orbital eccentricity of 0.017 which is relatively circlular. Pluto has a much more eccentric orbit, with an eccentricity of 0.25, with perihelion and apthelion of 4400 and 7400 million km respectively. If you're looking for loads of fun, the easiest way to construct an ellipse is by taking two drawing pins, sticking them into a piece of paper, wrapping a loose piece of string around them, and then using moving a pencil around the loop, keeping it taught at all times. With this method the pins represent the two foci. Keplar's First Law is significant in that most ancient astronomers believed that the planets moved in circular orbits. Keplars Second Law The radius vector sweeps out equal areas in equal times. This states that the line joining the planet to the sun sweeps the same area in equal times. This means, given Keplar's First Law, that planets orbit quickest when they are nearest the sun and the radius vector is smaller, than when they are furthest from the sun. Keplar's Third Law The time period squared is directly proportional to the distance cubed . 46. CARTOSAT -1 05.05.2005 Launched by PSLV-C6, carries two panchromatic cameras - PAN (fore) and PAN (aft) - with 2.5 meter resolution. The cam mounted with a tilt of +26 deg and -5 deg along the track to provide stereo images.
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