The burden is on you to seek out new opportuni ties Dont be afraid to ask

The burden is on you to seek out new opportuni ties

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The burden is on you to seek out new opportuni-ties. Don’t be afraid to ask friends and associates to refer you or make introductions. Put forth the effort to build and maintain a career network on sites such as LinkedIn. It will come in handy when it’s time to job search.UNDERGRADUATESTypically, candidates coming straight out of college will find job leads through campus recruiting, and campus job fairs are the first place to look. A list of participat-ing companies is always posted. You should prepare for a fair by selecting and researching the firms that interest you most. Bring several copies of your resume, including an ASCII text version because an increas-ing number of companies use online recruiting tools and will want to scan your resume into their system. (Most career centers offer good counseling on resume writing. Draw on that resource! Also check outKiller Cover Letters and Resumes!, available from .com.) Though you may get an in-depth interview on the spot, don’t be discouraged if you only speak with a recruiter for a minute. The most important thing is to present yourself and your resume. Keep a list of the companies you approach so that when they call, you’ll remember how they got your name and number.Recent graduates should also apply to specific com-panies on the basis of personal research. Approach potential hirers with a cover letter and resume. In general, you should not submit recommendations and transcripts unless they are specifically requested. This doesn’t mean you should forget about them. Line up key references: professors and intern and co-op employers. MBASThere’s a myth perpetuated to MBA grads that the degree qualifies them for management positions. The truth is that even MBAs have to prove themselves to an employer. “I would say in a general sense that an MBA degree is not targeted by people hiring IT profession-als,” says one insider. “At the end of the day, the things employers are looking for are technical training, work experience, and on-the-job training.”Still, good business skills are always needed. Take advantage of job fairs, company websites, and trade
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57CHAPTER 1AT A GLANCEWETFEET INSIDER GUIDECHAPTER 2THE INDUSTRYCHAPTER 3THE COMPANIESCHAPTER 4ON THE JOBCHAPTER 5THE WORKPLACECHAPTER 7FOR YOUR REFERENCECHAPTER 6GETTING HIREDshows when looking for work. Professional organiza-tions, committees, and clubs can provide networking opportunities, but don’t overcommit. These organiza-tions can be valuable, but they also take up a lot of time. Select only the ones most relevant to your long-term career plans.MIDCAREER CANDIDATESMidcareer candidates looking to work in a new capac-ity don’t necessarily need to change companies. In fact, the best place to start switching fields is often in your current workplace. Volunteer for projects that will provide experience in your area of interest, and take advantage of internal connections and training oppor-tunities. You may be able to move laterally within your company.
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