Opposition parties usually favour reform but sitting

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-Opposition parties usually favour reform but sitting governments do not.A Case for Reform
-Hiemstra and Jansen argue that electoral systems—like much of politics—reflect values-In particular,FPTP systems produce stable and effective government,but to do so, they are also unfair.-All voters should be represented, not just the majority.-They would like this corrected by introducing MMP.Every vote should count-Voters are due representation that is reflective of their vote.-Because of winner take all politics, 49.6% of voters cast votes for parties thatdidn't get elected.-This is illustrated in the 2001 BC election where the Liberal governmentreceived 97% of the seats with 58% of the vote (now you know why therewas a referendum in BC).-FPTP almost always over-represents the majority. It was designed to do so.
What are the check in place in the Canadian government? Does the prime ministerhave too much power?-What is said to themedia?-Which votes areconfidence?Globalization-The PMs power is only strengthened by globalization-He belongs to a number of clubs of heads of government including the G8, and AsiaPacific Economic cooperation-He is on the world stage and these issues are his to respond to…his reach extendsbeyond Canada-He has a free hand to negotiate and his negotiations are often binding…classicChretien quote…what happens if your trade minister disagrees? “Then I will have anew trade minister the next morning”

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Term
Fall
Professor
Heather Bastedo
Tags
Democracy, Separation of Powers, Westminster system

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