Their differences such as their characteristics in

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their differences, such as their characteristics, in which both exists outside of the dominant group, but within it as well. However, the key difference between the two concepts is that in Du Bois’ concept of double consciousness, the individual experiences more of the negative aspects of being an outsider, such as racism and oppression, and must still find ways to co-exist as a Black person
THE STRANGER AND DOUBLE CONSCIOUSNESS 6 and as an American (Adams, & Sydie, 2002). Although the stranger is vulnerable to discrimination, they experience more of the positive aspects of being an outsider, and often benefit from their outsider status, such as their social distance being both near and far, resulting in their objectivity within the dominant group. In addition, Du Bois discussed how he felt like a stranger, or an outcast in his own land, whereas the stranger, according to Simmel, is aware that they’re foreigners to the land, and are therefore more accepting of their outsider status (Adams, & Sydie, 2002). For example, if one decides to move to another country, they must also realize and accept that they will be a minority. However, in Du Bois case, as well as the rest of the African American population, they were born in the country, and are therefore American citizens, yet they feel detached, and not fully integrated within their own country. In this sense, African Americans are born with the veil, as described by Du Bois, whereas the stranger embraces their outsider status in a way.
THE STRANGER AND DOUBLE CONSCIOUSNESS 7 References Adams, B. N., & Sydie, R. A. (2002). Classical Sociological Theory. Thousand Oaks, Calif: SAGE Publications, Inc. Crossman, A. (2019). Definition and Examples of Social Distance in Psychology. Retrieved from Crossman, A. (2019). What Is Symbolic Interactionism? Retrieved from Itzigsohn, J., & Brown, K. (2015). Sociology and the Theory of Double Consciousness . Retrieved from Morris-Reich, A. (2019). Georg Simmel’s Logic of the Future: “The Stranger”, Zionism, and “Bounded Contingency.” Theory, Culture & Society . Retrieved from

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