AbPsych - Research paper draft

In addition to the inclusion criteria there was also

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diagnosis of generalized anxiety disorder. In addition to the inclusion criteria there was also an exclusion criteria, which eliminated certain subjects from the subject pool. The exclusion criteria contained the following characteristics: 1) any unstable, or severe axis III medical disorder 2) any current or recent history of schizophrenic disorder, bipolar disorder, or cluster A or B axis II disorder, 3) any neurological disorder, 4) alcohol or substance abuse, any form of eating disorder, or major depression in the previous twelve months, and 5) current association of psychotherapeutic or psychopharmological treatment. Statistical analyses. At the end of treatment as well as a 6 and 12 month post- treatment follow up, patients were measured using various tests. The primary exam given was the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale , which included 14 items that were to be rated on a 5-point scale. Additional testing that was applied consisted of self-report measures such as Penn State Worry Questionnaire (F=0.44, df=1, 55, p=0.51), State-Trait Anxiety inventory trait measure (F=0.02, df=1, 55, p=0.03), Beck Anxiety Inventory (F=0.02, df=1, 55, p=0.16), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale anxiety scale (F=0.48, df=1,
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6 55, p=0.49) (Falk Leichsenring et al., 2009) . All of the exams were examined by one-way analyses of variance (ANOVAs). Results and discussion. The results concluded that 26 (89.7%) of 29 cognitive- behavioral therapy sessions were conducted correctly in accordance to the treatment manual and for short-term psychodynamic psychosocial therapy 24 (85.7%) of 28 were properly conducted (Falk Leichsenring et al., 2009). The study showed no significant differences in the clinical or demographic variables as well as not much variance within the dropout rates during treatment (x^2=0.01, df=1, p=0.91). (Falk Leichsenring et al., 2009) Multiple uses of the ANOVAs were used to compare both treatments however not many significant differences were found. Where cognitive-behavioral therapy demonstrated the larger treatment effect was within the Penn State Worry Questionnaire (t=3.19, df=52, p<0.01), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory Throughout the treatment, both were associated positively with significant improvement. However, cognitive-behavioral therapy demonstrated superior results in measures of anxiety, worrying, and depression. Being that cognitive-behavioral therapy shows some slight dominance there is a possibility that there are more differences between both treatment results however the subject pool may be too small. The subject pool size was identified as one of the limitations within this study. Follow up examinations occurred both six and twelve months after treatment sessions ended. Comparison of Behavior therapy and Cognitive Behavior Therapy in the Treatment of Generalized Anxiety disorder by Gillian Butler et al. 1991 This article directly compares the results of behavioral therapy versus cognitive- behavioral therapy. During the time of this research article, limited evidence existed to
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7 Generalized Anxiety Disorder prove cognitive-behavioral therapy was the superior treatments for patients diagnosed with generalized anxiety disorder which was the primary purpose for this study. The
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