The girls were encouraged to think outside of the selfie box when taking their

The girls were encouraged to think outside of the

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relationships and dismissing unrealistic standards of beauty. The girls were encouraged to “think outside of the selfie box” when taking their selfies and to portray their true selves. Some girls
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33 used Photoshop, while others utilized costumes and makeup in their selfies, but whatever the girls chose to do creatively with their selfies, the lesson that was conveyed and taught from this program was that there is more than one way for girls to represent themselves and that they do not have to emulate conventional beauty or fit into a certain mold. Simone Darcy, the photo media artist who worked with the project along with program coordinator Fiona Whitton, said, “It’s about playing with different ways of looking at one’s self... and you don’t even have to look beautiful in front of the camera all the time” (Layton, 2014). The group of girls took advantage of the opportunity that they had to take selfies that did not involve “duck face” or had them looking flawless with gorgeous makeup and hair. One girl wore a headdress of flowers with a huge fern covering her eyes, another wore heart-shaped sunglasses and a fake beard, and one girl even covered her face entirely with her hands. 14-year- old Tyra Watkins said of the photos, which were put on display for the public in Australia's Lake Macquarie City Gallery during the summer of 2014, “I now look at photos from a different perspective and they have so much more meaning. I see myself coming out of my comfort zone and doing things I didn’t think I could do” (Layton, 2014). In Tel Aviv in the summer of 2014, Israeli residents documented their weeks taking cover in bomb shelters by taking “bomb shelter selfies” which were accompanied by the hashtag #BombShelterSelfie and which were posted on the “Bomb Shelter Selfie” group page on Facebook. From couples to families to groups of friends, the residents laughed, smiled, and made funny faces in their selfies, and vowed to “keep on smiling” despite the cacophony of air-raid sirens around them warning of Hamas airstrikes. The hope and optimism of the selfies were powerful with Sara Eisen, creator of the Facebook group, explaining that the point of the selfies and the group was to show the world
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34 “that we weren’t letting this get to us.” Stephen Epstein, one of the group members, said that the selfies were meant to express survival despite the heaviness that was in their hearts. Eisen, keeping up with the plethora of selfies trends, appropriately said of the creation of the group, “There’s a selfie for everything so why not bomb shelters?” (Warren, 2014) Along with the controversial and jaw-dropping selfies of the non-celebrities, the cult of the celebrity selfie is both powerful and popular with reality television star and Kardashian family member Kylie Jenner, pop star Justin Bieber, and rapper Snoop Dogg leading the plethora of followers that these three and other famous people have on Instagram ( The Huffington Post , 2013). The celebrity selfie is more than an ego trip, it shows the star at their most candid and is a personal glimpse into their lives (Stylist.co.uk, 2014). As actor James Franco said in his article
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