respondents spent online frequency of checking social media frequency of

Respondents spent online frequency of checking social

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respondents spent online, frequency of checking social media, frequency of posting on social Fig 1. Privacy & security of general online information vs. health information. Concern about privacy and security of information was measured on a 1–10 scale. Percentages represent respondents who selected 6–10, indicating concern. Control of privacy of information was measured on a Likert scale with response options of No control, Not much control, A lot of control, and Complete control. Percentages reflect respondents who selected A lot to Complete control. Security of information was measured on a Likert scale with response options of Not at all secure, Not very secure, Somewhat secure, and Very secure. Percentages reflect respondents who selected Somewhat to Very secure. * Significant at P < 0.05. Table 2. Predictors of level of concern about privacy of online and health information * . Online Information Health Information Characteristic/Online habits Β coefficient 95% Confidence interval Β coefficient 95% Confidence interval Education level 0.224 0.021–0.427 0.268 0.061–0.475 Generation group 0.211 0.022–0.400 0.411 0.218–0.604 Gender 0.238 -0.035–0.510 0.252 -0.027–0.531 Income level -0.130 -0.332–0.072 -0.102 -0.309–0.104 Race/Ethnicity 0.122 -0.103–0.346 0.267 0.038–0.497 Political orientation 0.012 -0.021–0.044 0.015 -0.018–0.048 Risk orientation -0.098 -0.168 - -0.028 -0.033 -0.104–0.038 Frequency online -0.056 -0.170–0.058 -0.072 -0.189–0.044 Frequency check social media -0.113 -0.309–0.082 -0.041 -0.241–0.159 Frequency post to social media -0.038 -0.232–0.156 0.190 -0.009–0.388 Health & fitness device/app users 0.134 -0.149–0.417 0.035 -0.254–0.325 * Level of concern measured on continuous scale, anchored by 1 = Not at all concerned to 10 = Extremely concerned. Indicates P value < 0.05. Intergenerational perspectives on health privacy PLOS ONE | September 19, 2017 6 / 11
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media, and use of health and fitness devices and applications were not predictors of level of concern about privacy or security of online or health information (all P > 0.05). While Millennials were less concerned about the privacy and security of their health infor- mation, more Millennials (43%) than respondents of Generation X (30%) and the Baby Boomer Generation (32%) reported feeling that they had control over the privacy of their health information. Additionally, more Millennials (61%) than Generation X (55%) and Baby Boomers (48%) reported that their health information was secure. When asked how their level of concern has changed over the past 10 years, the majority of respondents in all generational cohorts reported that they are more concerned now about the privacy (54% of Millennials, 66% of Generation X, 65% of Baby Boomers) and security of their health information (53% of Millennials, 62% of Generation X, 63% of Baby Boomers). We also analyzed level of concern about privacy and security of health information within the Millennial Generation using ANOVA. We found that when we split those respondents into an Older Millennial group (ages 28–35 years) and a Younger Millennial group (18–27 years), Younger Millennials were less concerned about both the privacy [ F (3, 1309) = 11.969, p = .000] and the security [ F (3, 1309) = 9.743, p = .000] of health information than all other
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