but it had identified a real need to pay more attention to the people side of

But it had identified a real need to pay more

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– but it had identified a real need to pay more attention to the people side of technology implementations as part of the overall project management lifecycle. It found a solution in the tight integration of PMI and Changefirst’s PCI methodology. This took place is a number of well-defined stages: 1. The easiest and most pragmatic thing to do first was to get the 20 PCI risk dimensions integrated into the standard project scorecard. Progress against these change risk factors was then tracked in the same way as other project deliverables, by the project steering committee. 2. The next stage was to influence key sponsors in the organisation to get change risks integrated into the process of initiating the project. For example: early risk analysis and planning built in at the proposal stage, along with budget & resources for implementation. 3. Change risks were also built into the main risk management framework. This ensured that the project steering committee tracked change risks the same way as technical project risks, using the RAG rating. 4. A further development was to build the PCI “change checkpoints” into the project management software being used to track projects. These checkpoints were built into the quality gate process for projects, and they were not allowed to move on to the next stage until they were satisfied that the checkpoint criteria were fulfilled. 5. One of the major breakthroughs in integrating PCI and PMI was to get the two methodologies aligned in training, too. An employee has to be accredited in both methodologies in order to become a certified programme manager – another simple, pragmatic way to align PCI and project management methodologies to ensure the future success of projects. Case study: PCI and PMI integration in a Financial S ervices IT department
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7 Project management depends on strong skills in analysis, planning and organisation, and rigorous attention to the detail and processes that ensure activities are performed on schedule. Change management, however, is fundamentally about people. It’s more like a messy ‘contact sport’ that involves learning new behaviours, influencing people to change their mindset, and encouraging people to give up entrenched ways of working. Of course, an effective project manager will often have strong people skills. And it’s true that a project management methodology like Prince 2 or PMI will emphasise the importance of addressing people issues such as commitment building and managing resistance, and will naturally include deliverables such as training and communication plans. However, project management methodologies offer little practical guidance in how to motivate and mobilise people to change. Most project managers will spend the majority of their time worrying about practical issues with deliverables and timelines, not the people risks of the change process.
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