Juxtaposition of imagery i only recognise suffering

This preview shows page 25 - 27 out of 27 pages.

Juxtaposition of imagery “I only recognise suffering in numbers and lists and not in the laments and pleas of a human being, of a mother, screaming for acknowledgment” Baker realises the cost of his bias: he discounts the personal, and so cruelly and unfeelingly discounts the humanity of his family and those history is made by and is made up of. Unanswered questions and uncertain language “You sure this is the right place? …Where’s our house? .... Where am I?”… It was there, or maybe here” Baker presents memory in a highly dubious and unreliable light, initially emphasising it’s shortcomings and limitations rather than it’s power to enrich and foster empathy as he does later on. Rhetorical question “Does history remember more than memory? Baker begins to question his perceptions of history as the superior discourse. Use of historical documents and conventions. Statistics, letters, records, a glossary, and an explanation of sources. In equipping his work with a strong historiographical dimension, Baker infuses The 50 th Gate with a sense of academic authority and validity so that readers are unable to regard it as a purely emotional treatise, and so dismiss its intellectual merit.
Yr 12 English Notes 2013 Page 1 The Action in the Ghetto in Rohatyn, March 1942 The Action in Ghetto in Rohatyn, March 1942 From ‘I cannot forget’ by Alexander Kimel Do I want to remember? The peaceful ghetto, before the raid: Children shaking like leaves in the wind. Mothers searching for a piece of bread. Shadows, on swollen legs, moving with fear. No, I don't want to remember, but how can I forget? Do I want to remember, the creation of hell? The shouts of the Raiders, enjoying the hunt. Cries of the wounded, begging for life. Faces of mothers carved with pain. Hiding Children, dripping with fear. No, I don't want to remember, but how can I forget? Do I want to remember, my fearful return? Families vanished in the midst of the day. The mass grave steaming with vapor of blood. Mothers searching for children in vain. The pain of the ghetto, cuts like a knife. No, I don't want to remember, but how can I forget? Do I want to remember, the wailing of the night? The doors kicked ajar, ripped feathers floating the air. The night scented with snow-melting blood. While the compassionate moon, is showing the way. For the faceless shadows, searching for kin. No, I don't want to remember, but I cannot forget. Do I want to remember this world upside down? Where the departed are blessed with an instant death. While the living condemned to a short wretched life, And a long tortuous journey into unnamed place, Converting Living Souls, into ashes and gas. No. I Have to Remember and Never Let You Forget.
Yr 12 English Notes 2013 Page 1 Title Composer Text type The Action in the Ghetto in Rohatyn, March 1942 Alexander Kimel Poem Summary ‘The Action in the Ghetto’ is a poem based on the perspective of a holocaust survivor. Kimel re-tells the horrors that he had survived during the holocaust. Kimel uses various literary techniques to create a visual for the audience to ‘see’ his experience.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture