Examples see a few more examples below 4 3 4 3 4 4 4

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ExamplesSee a few more examples below:4343= 4 · 4 · 4In this example, is the base numberand is the exponent4is the number to be multiplied by itself, and is how many timesit will be multiplied.43= 4 × 4 × 4 = 6462= 6 × 6 = 36The means will appear — or be multiplied — twice35= 3 · 3 · 3 · 3 · 3 = 243The means the will appear times.- 2)2(Copyright © 2019 MindEdge Inc. All rights reserved. Duplication prohibited.
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1.11.1 Applications of ExponentsApplication of ExponentsUnderstanding exponents and their application is helpful both in business and in our everyday lives.= - 2 × - 2 = 4The means -2will appear — or be multiplied — twice- 5)3= - 5 · - 5 · - 5= 25 · - 5= - 125(- 2)4= - 2 · - 2 · - 2 · - 2= 4 · - 2 · - 2= - 8 · - 2= 16(51= 5No multiplication here! The means the will appear only once. Any base with an exponent ofsimply equals the base.80= 1Any non-zeronumber with an exponent of (or raised to the zero power) equals .Copyright © 2019 MindEdge Inc. All rights reserved. Duplication prohibited.
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The repeated multiplication associated with exponents often represents repeated events in life,such as receiving interest from a bank or determining probabilities associated with sampling.Exponents are also used to represent large numbers that occur in the real world.When we look at exponents, we are essentially looking at the parameters of a test; our basenumber exhibits the number of possible outcomes of one attempt or trial, and our exponentillustrates how many times that trial or attempt is performed.In terms of probability, calculating exponents can tell us what the chances are of somethingoccurring. Once you calculate the product of an exponent, you can essentially find out how likely anevent is to happen after number of attempts.
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Applied ExampleFor example, say you flip a coin 6times. There are 2possible outcomes for every flip — heads or tails.The 2, or base number, represents the number of possible outcomes for each trial (in this case, a coinflip), and the 6, or exponent, represents the number of trials performed (in this case, how many times the coin isflipped).26= 64So there are 64total possible outcomes of a coin being flipped 6Copyright © 2019 MindEdge Inc. All rights reserved. Duplication prohibited.
times.Therefore, if you were to guess the outcome of each flip, there's a 164chance you would guess every flip correctly.
1.11.2 Game: Exponents and Roots1.12 Introduction to Order of OperationsIntroduction to Order of OperationsUsing a Calculator with Order of OperationsSome, but not all, calculators are programmed to followthe rules of Order of Operations. It's important thatstudents be cautious to follow Order of Operations whenusing a calculator.Use the commands on the right side of the calculator toenter the addition, subtraction, multiplication, anddivision operations. Graphing calculators include aparentheses, (), option for cases that include two or more sets ofparentheses. Click the CEcommand to clear anyexpression and enter a new one.Order of Operations is a set of rules that defines the order in which mathematical operations should

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