How do workers counteract their deportability MWs engage in practices of self

How do workers counteract their deportability mws

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How do workers counteract their deportability? MWs engage in practices of self-discipline. These strategies often contradictory and put them in competition or recreate the deportation regime even as they secure own employment self-discipline in compliance with the deportation regime; and causing the deportation of others. physical but also social containment and self-regulationConstantly looking over shoulderrelies on civilian informers---Report to authorities or complain to employers, or slow workers down avoid public spaces, and restrain their wants and desires.Limits Drinking, Socialization, intimate relationships, curbs reactions to insults or fightsUnder the current Deportation regime---quitting/leaving their employer is not a viable optiontied to one job, one employer and one location. extreme power imbalance between migrants and employers deportability: (i) also applies to authorised workers employed on a temporary basis, (ii) various actors’ employers, recruitment agencies and representatives of the sending countries (iii) In their effort to minimise deportability, migrants often co-construct the deportation regime. Fear of retribution/expulsion is one of the biggest barriers and concerns of workers who attempt to organizemany foreign workers are still afraid or too busy working to join the movement Warned by recruiters and employers not to join unions or collectively organize. Threatened to be kicked out of programs or family face consequences of their labour mobilization Vulnerability is compounded by the recent provincial cutbacks to Legal Aid services and other migrant service providers in Ontario. Don’t Ask Don’t Tell Policy. In line with Toronto’s move to becoming a sanctuary city in 2013 (and followed by other cities across Canada), provinces and public institutions are increasingly instating policies to not ask about an individual’s migration status to discern eligibility for social services and not report to border authorities if they are revealed to not have full and formal status. This has been adopted by TDSB and children are not discriminated in their access to school based on their or parents’ immigration status. However, Toronto Police Services (TPS) has limited their policy to a Don’t Ask victims or witnesses about their migration status policy. Anyone undergoing a criminal investigation may be asked about their status. TPS has maintained that it is part of their mandate to report to CBSA if it comes to their knowledge that someone does not hold valid status. Access to services limited. Many service providers ask for identification. This is a deterrent for migrants to access services since they fear exclusion, deportation and being reported. Public service providers may be limited by the conditions of their funding from offering services to precarious migrant
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