the standoff with Ukraine may mean it struggles to grow at all this year

The standoff with ukraine may mean it struggles to

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the standoff with Ukraine may mean it struggles to grow at all this year, according to some analysts. 2a) Sanctions add incentive Title: Sanctions can hurt Russia, if EU can take pain Source: USA TODAY Date: March 26, 2014 Author: Luigi Serenelli And despite the ongoing crisis in Ukraine and the potential for escalation if Russia were to try to invade the east of the country, as some fear it might, the 28 EU member states will not agree on targeting the energy sector with sanctions, say some analysts. The EU members "can only replace the supply from Russia in the long term by finding alternative resources," such as investing much more in Caspian resources," Meister said. Some suggest Europe can make up for any disruption on gas supplies from Russia by buying from U.S. liquefied natural gas suppliers. The Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee plans to hold hearings on expanding U.S. natural gas exports. "Diminishing Russia's economic leverage in the region should be a key component of America's response," said Nile Gardiner, an author of a recent white paper on U.S.-Russia relations as director of The Heritage Foundation's Margaret Thatcher Center for Freedom. "This could be accomplished to a large extent simply by liberalizing global energy markets. The U.S. has antiquated and unnecessary restrictions on exporting liquefied natural gas and crude oil, and Congress should make lifting these restrictions a priority." Ukraine, which has seen its gas supplies shut off by Moscow in the dead of winter as a weapon, has been making plans to wean itself from dependency on Russia. In 2013, Ukraine reached deals with Royal Dutch Shell and Chevron to explore and develop the country's two large shale gas fields in Yuzivska and Olesska. 2b) Increases energy diversification Title: Why Russia is Unlikely to Use Natural Gas As A Weapon In Ukraine Crisis Source: Forbes Magazine Date: March 3 rd , 2014 Author: Coats Christopher “Finally, the issue that may work most in Europe’s favor is Russia’s own dependence on energy revenue from the west. For European customers, Russia provides a significant contribution to its
energy needs, but for Moscow, EU consumers provide about $100 million a day to Russian coffers, accounting for about 3% of the country’s overall economic output. Furthermore, a broader threat to Russia’s gas imports, which have already fallen from 45% of EU demand to less than 30% today, would likely lend more support to alternative projects.” 2c) Increases energy diversification Title: EU leaders accelerate quest to reduce energy reliance on Russia Source: Reuters Date: March 21 st , 2014 Author: Barbara Lewis “European Union leaders on Friday discussed accelerating moving energy supplies away from Russia, saying Moscow's annexation of Crimea made them more determined to reduce dependence on Russian oil and gas. The EU has made progress in improving its energy security after gas crises in 2006 and 2009, when rows over unpaid gas bills between Kiev and Moscow led to the disruption of supplies to western Europe. However, it has not managed to reduce

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