These results may be inescapable and may contain

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reaction the person has to the incident, involving emotions of anxiety, vulnerability, and terror. These results may be inescapable and may contain harmful coping behaviors (Kusmaul, & Anderson, 2018). 7
ELDERLY AND DEPRESSION The trauma-informed care viewpoint is beneficial for the profession of social work and includes many values that may by now be in effect in long-term facilities. In long-term facilities have a requirement of person-centered care as trauma-informed care of ethics of choice for empowerment. Trauma-informed care is grounded to restate the inquiry of wrong to happen to you? This change in asking this form of insight the individual with the social worker went from being the problem to having difficulty. Utilizing this outlook in a long-term care agency gathers all workers to this vantage point. Trauma-informed care creates a person-centered locational culture that considers all parties in ways that shelter suffering survivors from re-traumatization (Kusmaul, & Anderson, 2018). Mending is a procedure of adjustment through which the elderly progress their mental and physical soundness, survive a self-directed life, and endeavor to grasp their full ability. In the elderly population, a traumatic involvement could be a loss of a spouse or peers, life- threating findings, limitations and disability, memory loss, loss of roles and resources, and an increase on depending on caregivers. The trauma creates a hazard to the flourishing aging process by meddling with personal relations and productive activity (Kusmaul, & Anderson, 2018). Conclusion Social workers must gain the knowledge and skills necessary to intervene with elders and depression at the macro level; the government should implement the provision for the elderly. With the use of evidence-based interventions and assessments, anything is possible. 8
ELDERLY AND DEPRESSION References Charchit P. Mehta, Atul V. Desale, Vandana A. Kakrani, & Jitendra S. Bhawalkar. (2016). Economic Dependency and Depression in Elderly. Journal of Krishna Institute of Medical Sciences University , (1), 100. Retrieved from - com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/login.aspx? direct=true&db=edsdoj&AN=edsdoj.3cbb0ce368d849dc92d2ba888f5bef80&site=eds- live&scope=site Ell K. (2006). Depression care for the elderly: reducing barriers to evidence-based practice. Home health care services quarterly , 25 (1-2), 115–148. doi:10.1300/J027v25n01_07 End-of-Life Care for People with Dementia. (n.d.). Retrieved on May 1, 2019, from Gensichen J. (2006). IMPACT collaborative care improves depression in elderly patients in primary care in the longer term. Evidence Based Mental Health , 9 (3), 76. Retrieved from ? direct=true&db=rzh&AN=106345446&site=eds-live&scope=site Katon W.J., Schoenbaum M., Fan M., Callahan, C.M., Williams, J., Hunkeler, E., … Unützer , J.

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