Later works explore the dynamic potential of the pianoforte Haydn used a

Later works explore the dynamic potential of the

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Later works explore the dynamic potential of the pianoforte. Haydn used a clavichord in his early years. The piano sonatas follow the same line of development as the symphonies and string quartets.
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HAYDN’S VOCAL MUSIC
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Operas Haydn held his vocal works in higher regard than his instrumental works, unlike the present-day reputation. Haydn spent much of his time at Eszterháza composing and producing operas. Armida (1784), a serious opera, is remarkable for its dramatic accompanied recitatives and grand arias. Haydn’s operas are rarely performed today.
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Masses His last six masses are large-scale festive works set for four vocal soloists, chorus, and orchestra with trumpets and timpani. Haydn retains traditional elements, such as fugal writing, and incorporates symphonic elements. Some of the masses reflect the pervading warlike atmosphere. Missa in tempore belli (Mass in Time of War, 1796) Lord Nelson Mass (1798)
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Oratorios Haydn heard Handel’s oratorios in London and was deeply moved. Inspired, he created two masterful oratorios. The Creation (1798), based on Genesis and Milton’s Paradise Lost The Seasons (1801) Both works were published in English and German (adapted by Baron van Swieten).
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The Creation
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Oratorios Haydn’s Depiction of Chaos at the beginning of The Creation is remarkable for its harmonies and drama. The Creation , recitative and chorus Setting of the opening words of the Bible Darkness: minor key, muted strings, and soft singing “Let there be Light”: choral outburst with full orchestra on C-major chord
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WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART (1756–1791)
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Family Mozart was born in Salzburg, a city with a long musical history. Mozart’s father, Leopold, was a performer and composer for the archbishop of Salzburg. Leopold promoted the musical lives of young Mozart and his talented sister Nannerl (1751– 1829).
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Travel Mozart toured throughout Europe (1762–1773) and was exposed to international styles
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Travel In Paris, he became interested in the keyboard works of Johann Schobert. In London, he met J. C. Bach, whose music had a lasting influence on him. In Italy, he assimilated operatic traditions, was influenced by Sammartini, and studied counterpoint with Padre Martini. In Vienna, he came into contact with Haydn’s music.
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After touring, Mozart lived primarily in Salzburg (1773–1781) He traveled with his mother to Munich, Augsburg, Mannheim, and Paris in 1777. His hopes for a good position came to nothing. His mother died in July 1778. He received a commission from Munich to compose Idomeneo (1781), an opera seria that reflects the reformist trends of Gluck.
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MOZART OF THE SALZBURG YEARS
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Piano sonatas Mozart composed thirteen of his piano sonatas and several sets of piano variations in Salzburg, including Ah, vous dirais-je maman, K. 265 (known as Twinkle, twinkle, little star ).
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  • Fall '07
  • Howell
  • Music, Paradise Lost , Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Mozart, Haydn, Franz Joseph Haydn

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