Idiosyncrasy credits tolerance a person builds over

Info icon This preview shows pages 35–50. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Idiosyncrasy credits: tolerance a person builds, over time, by conforming If earn enough, can (occasionally) deviate from group without penalty First conform, then dissent Minority influence usually happens via informational social influence
Image of page 35

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
when do people conform? Informational social influence: During a crisis When (believe) other people are experts If situation is ambiguous Greater the uncertainty, greater the conformity If everyone else is conforming
Image of page 36
when don’t people conform? Informational social influence: When don’t feel alone When feel certain about situation When thinking critically: Do other people really know better? Will conforming violate common sense or values/morality?
Image of page 37

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
when do people conform? Normative social influence: Need to belong: social acceptance is critical to our well-being Believe the opinions of others are important Don’t want to stand out or feel stupid Fear rejection —it’s difficult to risk social disapproval!
Image of page 38
when don’t people conform? Normative social influence: Don’t fear rejection Are aware of the potential influence Are not alone Have enough credibility with group to get away with it Don’t deviate too far
Image of page 39

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
consequences of nonconformity Informational social influence: May or may not make mistakes Normative social influence: Group may try to “bring you back to the fold” Group may criticize and withdraw Nonconformist “deviants” may be ostracized & excluded
Image of page 40
conformity in action e.g., Body image Western notion of ideal bodies affect men and women globally
Image of page 41

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
conformity in action Propaganda: Systematic attempt to manipulate thoughts & behavior of others
Image of page 42
compliance
Image of page 43

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
continuum of social influence resisting influence yielding to influence conformity compliance obedience independence assertiveness defiance automatic influence social pressure & norms requests orders
Image of page 44
definition Compliance : a change in behavior elicited by a direct request Tendency to agree to do things requested by others
Image of page 45

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
conformity vs. compliance Compliance = doing as you’re asked External behavior; internal opinion may be unchanged Conformity = deciding to be like others Change may be internal AND external 46
Image of page 46
conformity vs. compliance Normative social influence can lead to public compliance but not necessarily private acceptance People may publically agree with the group opinion in order to avoid social disapproval but privately believe something different
Image of page 47

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
promoting compliance Language of request: Talking fast, and/or catching people by surprise can increase compliance rates Phrasing (rather than actual content) of the request often matters Unusual requests Appearance of a reason
Image of page 48
promoting compliance 0 20 40 60 80 100 No Reason Reason Given Irrelevant Reason Percentage that Complied May I Use the Xerox Machine?
Image of page 49

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 50
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern