Although it looked like the two would marry the romance ended Dickinson was

Although it looked like the two would marry the

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Although it looked like the two would marry, the romance ended. Dickinson was increasingly reluctant to leave the house after 1862 and would often decline even to see visitors. Although she wrote 1,775 poems, only seven were published in her lifetime. All were deceptively simple, endless variations on the same pattern. Dickinson died at the age of 56. In 1890, thanks to her sister's efforts, Poems by Emily Dickinson was published, followed by more volumes over the next 60 years. "Emily Dickinson Is Born." History.com. A&E Television Networks, n.d. Web. 19 Jan. 2014. “They say that God is everywhere, and yet we always think of Him as somewhat of a recluse.” – Emily Dickinson
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Harriet Beecher Stowe Born: June 14, 1811, Litchfield, CT Died: July 1, 1896, Hartford, CT Born in Litchfield, Connecticut, Harriet Beecher was the seventh child of the Reverend Lyman Beecher, a Congregational minister and moral reformer, and Roxanna Foote Beecher. She was schooled at the Pierce Academy and at her sister Catharine Beecher's Hartford Female Seminary, where she also taught. She moved with the family to Cincinnati in 1832, when her father was appointed president of Lane Theological Seminary. The spectacle of chattel slavery across the Ohio River in Kentucky and its effects on the acquiescent commercial interests of white Cincinnati moved her deeply. Stowe wrote Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852), her most celebrated work. Sentimental and realistic by turns, the novel explored the cruelties of chattel slavery in the Upper and Lower South and exposed the moral ironies in the legal, religious, and social arguments of white apologists. "Harriet Beecher Stowe." History.com. A&E Television Networks, n.d. Web. 19 Jan. 2014. So much has been said and sung of beautiful young girls, why doesn't somebody wake up to the beauty of old women.” – Harriet Beecher Stowe
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Susan B. Anthony Born: February 15, 1820, Adams, MA Died: March 13, 1906, Rochester, NY Born on February 15, 1820, in Adams, Massachusetts, Anthony grew up in a politically active family. They worked to end slavery in what was called the abolitionist movement. They were also part of the temperance movement, which wanted the production and sale of alcohol limited or stopped completely. Anthony was inspired to fight for women's rights while campaigning against alcohol. She denied a chance to speak at a temperance convention because she was a woman. Anthony later realized that no one would take women in politics seriously unless they had the right to vote. Along with activist Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Anthony founded the National Woman Suffrage Association in 1869. Around this time, the two created and produced The Revolution, a weekly publication that lobbied for women's rights. Later the pair edited three volumes of History of Woman Suffrage together. When Anthony died on March 13, 1906, women still did not have the right to vote. It wasn't until 1920, 14 years after her death, that the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, giving all adult women the right to vote, was passed.
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