The aggregate demand curve shows the relationship between the aggregate price

The aggregate demand curve shows the relationship

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The aggregate demand curve shows the relationship between the aggregate price level and the quantity of aggregate output demanded. 2. The aggregate demand curve is downward sloping for two reasons. The first is the wealth effect of a change in the aggregate price level —a higher aggregate price level reduces the purchasing power of households’ wealth and reduces consumer spending. The second is the interest rate effect of a change in the aggregate price level —a higher aggregate price level reduces the purchasing power of households’ and firms’ money holdings, leading to a rise in interest rates and a fall in investment spending and consumer spending. Summary
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3. The aggregate demand curve shifts because of changes in expectations, changes in wealth not due to changes in the aggregate price level, and the effect of the size of the existing stock of physical capital. Policy makers can use fiscal policy and monetary policy to shift the aggregate demand curve. 4. The aggregate supply curve shows the relationship between the aggregate price level and the quantity of aggregate output supplied. Summary
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5. The short-run aggregate supply curve is upward sloping because nominal wages are sticky in the short run: a higher aggregate price level leads to higher profit per unit of output and increased aggregate output in the short run. 6. Changes in commodity prices, nominal wages, and productivity lead to changes in producers’ profits and shift the short-run aggregate supply curve. Summary
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7. In the long run, all prices are flexible and the economy produces at its potential output. If actual aggregate output exceeds potential output, nominal wages will eventually rise in response to low unemployment and aggregate output will fall. If potential output exceeds actual aggregate output, nominal wages will eventually fall in response to high unemployment and aggregate output will rise. So the long-run aggregate supply curve is vertical at potential output. Summary
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8. In the AD–AS model, the intersection of the short-run aggregate supply curve and the aggregate demand curve is the point of short-run macroeconomic equilibrium. It determines the short-run equilibrium aggregate price level and the level of short-run equilibrium aggregate output. Summary
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9. Economic fluctuations occur because of a shift of the aggregate demand curve (a demand shock ) or the short- run aggregate supply curve (a supply shock ). A demand shock causes the aggregate price level and aggregate output to move in the same direction as the economy moves along the short-run aggregate supply curve. A supply shock causes them to move in opposite directions as the economy moves along the aggregate demand curve. A particularly nasty occurrence is stagflation —inflation and falling aggregate output—which is caused by a negative supply shock.
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