Establish justice The framers hoped to create a system of government based on

Establish justice the framers hoped to create a

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Establish justice. The framers hoped to create a system of government based on fair laws that apply equally to all people. Ensure domestic tranquility. The framers wanted government to ensure peace and order. Provide for the common defense. The framers wanted the government to protect the nation against foreign enemies. Promote the general welfare. The framers hoped the government would ensure the well-being of the citizens. Secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity. The framers hoped to guarantee freedom for Americans, then and in the future. Articles Establish Our National Government The main body of the Constitution consists of seven articles. seven articles are further divided into sections and clauses The first three articles establish the three branches of government legislative, executive, and judicial—and define their powers. These articles lay out the basic structure of the national government. four remaining articles of the Constitution cover various subjects, including relations among the states, the supremacy of national law, and the amendment process. Article 1 Establishes the Legislative Branch first article sets up Congress as the lawmaking body in government. It describes the two chambers of Congress, the Senate and the House of Representatives, as well as the election, terms, and qualifications of their members. This is the longest article in the Constitution, reflecting the founders' belief in the importance of the legislature in a representative democracy. Section 8 of Article I lays out some of the main powers granted to Congress. enumerated powers: those powers of the national government that are specifically listed in the U.S. Constitution implied powers: those powers of the national government, and particularly of Congress, that are not specifically listed in the Constitution, but which the government can reasonably claim as part of its governing responsibility Necessary and Proper Clause: a clause in Article 1, Section 8 of the U.S. Constitution, which says that Congress can “make all laws which shall be necessary and proper” for carrying out its duties; also known as the Elastic Clause Elastic Clause: a clause in Article 1, Section 8 of the U.S. Constitution that allows Congress to stretch its lawmaking powers to include laws that are “necessary and proper” for carrying out its duties; also known as the Necessary and Proper Clause habeas corpus: the right of accused persons to be brought before a judge to hear the charges against them Section 9 of Article I lists powers denied to Congress.
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Enumerated Powers: those powers of the national government that are specifically listed in the U.S. Constitution Implied Powers: those powers of the national government, and particularly of Congress, that are not specifically listed in the Constitution, but which the government can reasonably claim as part of its governing responsibility
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