New york ny mcgraw hill irwin most good faith drug

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New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Irwin.
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Most good-faith drug testing programs are legally acceptable if the organization has taken four steps. What are they? The following steps must be taken in order for good-faith drug testing programs to be legally acceptable, according to Ivancevich & Konopaske (2013) “(1) Inform all job applicants of the organization’s drug-testing screening program (2) Establish a high-quality control testing procedure with a reliable testing laboratory (3) Perform any drug tests in a professional, nonthreatening manner, and (4) Keep all results confidential” (p. 240). Overall its important for corporations to do their due diligence as its been found that “U.S. corporations lose 500 million days each year to alcohol abuse and subsequently $120 billion annually attributable to drug abuse” (Ivancevich & Konopaske, 2013, p. 239). Reference: Ivancevich, J. M, & Konopaske, R. (2013). Human Resource Management, Twelfth Edition . New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Irwin. Inadequate training of raters can lead to a series of problems in completing performance evaluations. Discuss the potential problems. Problems can certainly come up when employees, managers and subordinates are being evaluated. Many problems come up because managers or raters have been inadequately trained, a number of these problems, according to Ivancevich & Konopaske (2013) are as follows: 1. Problems with standard evaluations or basic use of standard words used to evaluate employees (i.e. good, adequate, satisfactory, and excellent) may mean many different things to different raters or employees 2. Halo effect occurs when a rater assigns ratings for several dimensions of performance on the basis of an overall general impression of the ratee, the initial first impression may cause a rater to move the scale one way or the other 3. Leniency or harshness may occur in raters’ evaluations due to the color “lens of their glasses” (i.e. some see everything as good which are lenient, and others see everything as bad which are harsh). 4. Central tendency errors occur when a rater avoids using high or low ratings and assigns everything average, which then fails to discriminate between subordinates 5. Recency-of-Events Errors happen when the time frame of the behavior is being evaluated, where most raters forget about past behavior vs. current, thus most ratings depend on the last several weeks vs. past 6 – 12 months 6. Contrast Effects happens when a supervisor unknowingly compares employees present performance with their past performance and when they are rating employees with regard to other employees vs. being objective 7. Personal Bias Error is an error related to personal bias held by a supervisor that can be blatant discrimination because of sex or race, or even a supervisor playing favorites amongst their team (p. 276-279). Reference: Ivancevich, J. M, & Konopaske, R. (2013). Human Resource Management, Twelfth Edition . New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Irwin.
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What if any issues are associated with the job ranking method of job evaluation?
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