new research relative to that magnesium of all things estrogens of all things

New research relative to that magnesium of all things

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new research relative to that, magnesium of all things, estrogens of all things are considered researched and evidenced based research, that is important to the administration of these types of medications that are considered neuroprotective and they preserve brain function. Ancrod is new to me, in your book it
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8 talks very limited about it. You know it’s in clinical trials, perhaps not even at clinical trial now, but it is in research. It is bat saliva that is being used for research in occlusive types of strokes. Carotid artery angioplasty with stenting, this is pretty common and a lot of times this is done before an event. This is often considered and elective and prophylactic type of therapy because in your carotids, what this is just stenting. In your carotids they put stents in the carotid arteries to open them up because we can tell when there’s a problem with the carotids. We can do ultrasounds of the carotids to see if they are patent or not. And a lot of times when clients have TIAs or brain attacks or the RINDs, one thing we will do is go ahead and search their carotid and see how much they are open or not and how occluded they are. Actually they can have stents placed there. Endarterectomy, that is relative to the carotids also, and that is like catheter oblation. These can be dangerous because its oblation and the carotids become sclerosed and plaquey like the coronaries. So with the endarterectomy, they go in and really kind of shave out that plaque. As I said, this can be considered dangerous because that plaque can break off and end up and emboli somewhere. That is something to be mindful of. Then your extracranial-intracranial bypass that’s going to be like brain surgery. That is going to be an equivalent of open heart surgery where they actually bypass an area that we know is occluded and would cause dysfunction to the brain tissue below it. Management of intracranial bleeding of course is going to be a craniotomy, a surgical incision. We now know we have some interventional, radiological types of procedures that are less invasive of course. Interventional radiology we can actually access the aneurysm by the groin, most likely with a heart Cath, and then perhaps then place stents or whatever might need to be placed there. So we don’t have to actually do a craniotomy to reduce the ICP. Ok disturbed sensory perception, most likely as far as planning nursing interventions are really going to help clients adjust or adapt to the changes that they have to keep them safe. Many of these things are not things that are going to go away, the deficits they end up with after an event. Things of importance here are going to be relative to which hemisphere of the brain is affected where you see the right hemisphere damage is typically going to cause difficulty in the performance of visual-perceptual or spatial-perceptual tasks. Those are things like proprioception, their relation to where they are physically, what’s around them, may change what their line of sight should be, it’s thrown off or skewed. They are
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  • Winter '16
  • Traumatic brain injury, brain attack

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